Imperative meaning

ĭm-pĕrə-tĭv
Frequency:
Necessary or urgent.
adjective
7
1
Expressing a command or plea; peremptory.

Requests that grew more and more imperative.

adjective
5
1
(grammar) Of, relating to, or constituting the mood that expresses a command or request.
adjective
3
1
A binding or compelling rule, duty, requirement, etc.
noun
2
0
Having the nature of, or indicating, power or authority; commanding.

An imperative gesture.

adjective
1
0
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Absolutely necessary; urgent; compelling.

It is imperative that I go.

adjective
1
0
(gram.) Designating or of the mood of a verb that expresses a command, strong request, or exhortation.
adjective
1
0
A command; order.
noun
1
0
The definition of imperative is something that has authority or is absolutely necessary.

An example of imperative is the power that a government has over its people.

An example of imperative is the decision to give a cesarean in a breach birth.

adjective
0
0
Imperative is defined as a requirement or an order.

An example of imperative is a sergeant telling a soldier to do fifty push ups.

noun
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0
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It is imperative that you come here right now.

adjective
0
0
(computing theory) Having a semantics that incorporates mutable variables.
adjective
0
0
(grammar) Of, or relating to the imperative mood.
adjective
0
0
Expressing a command; authoritatively or absolutely directive.

Imperative orders.

adjective
0
0
(uncountable, grammar) The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.

The verbs in sentences like "Do it!" and "Say what you like!" are in the imperative.

noun
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0
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(countable, grammar) A verb in imperative mood.
noun
0
0
(countable) An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.

Visiting Berlin is an imperative.

noun
0
0

Origin of imperative

  • Middle English imperatif relating to the imperative mood from Old French from Late Latin imperātīvus from Latin imperātus past participle of imperāre to command emperor

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin imperātīvus.

    From Wiktionary