Ham meaning

hăm
A performer who overacts or exaggerates.
noun
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1
The thigh of the hind leg of certain animals, especially a hog.
noun
2
1
The definition of ham is the back part of the thigh or knee, or the hind leg of a four-legged animal.

An example of ham is the back leg of a pig which is served for Christmas dinner.

noun
1
1
A cut of meat from the thigh of a hog.
noun
1
1
The back of the knee.
noun
1
1
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In the Bible, a son of Noah and the brother of Japheth and Shem.
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The hock or hind leg of a four-legged animal.
noun
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0
The back of the thigh.
noun
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1
The buttocks.
noun
0
1
A licensed amateur radio operator.
noun
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1
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To overact.
verb
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To exaggerate or overdo (a dramatic role, for example).
verb
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1
(archaic) The part of the leg behind the knee.
noun
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1
The upper part of a hog's hind leg, or meat from this, salted, dried, smoked, etc.
noun
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1
(informal) A licensed amateur radio operator.
noun
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1
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(informal) An amateur or incompetent performer, esp. an actor who performs with showy exaggeration.
noun
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(slang) To act with exaggeration.
verb
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(informal) Having to do with licensed amateur radio operation.
adjective
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(bible, person, proper) Noah's second son: Gen. 6:10
noun
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1
An amateur radio operator. The term's origin is uncertain, but most likely came from early, pre-radio days, when Morse-code operators were referred to as "ham-fisted" and called "hams." Anecdote places the origin as the first initials of "Hertz," "Ampere" and "Marconi," the originators of radio technology, but the term was used before Marconi's time. See amateur radio.
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A ham-fisted person, i.e., someone with big, clumsy hands.
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An amateur radio operator. The exact origin and meaning of the term is vague. Some suggest that ham is a shortened and corrupted version of amateur.The most reliable origin seems to be in reference to a ham-fisted amateur telegrapher, as amateur radio operators traditionally were required to demonstrate a reasonable level of skill in Morse code telegraphy. Skilled telegraphers referred to someone lacking in proficiency using the pejorative terms plug or ham. This use of the term dates at least to 1899, when G.M. Dodge first included it in his book, The Telegraph Instructor, under the heading Definitions of Technical Terms Used in Railroad and Telegraphic Work. See also amateur radio service, Morse code, and telegraph.
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His Apostolic Majesty, the title given to a number of historical kings of Hungary.
initialism
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(biblical) A son of Noah and the brother of Japheth and Shem.
pronoun
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1
To ham is defined as to overact.

An example of ham is to add a lot of extra jokes to a play that were not originally written in the script.

verb
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Origin of ham

  • Middle English hamme from Old English hamm N., senses 6 and 7, possibly from ham-fatter a poor or amateurish actor

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition