Gammon definition

gămən
Frequency:
To deceive or mislead.
verb
3
0
Misleading or nonsensical talk; humbug.
noun
1
0
To talk misleadingly or deceptively.
verb
1
0
A victory in backgammon reached before the loser has succeeded in removing a single piece.
noun
0
0
To defeat in backgammon by scoring a gammon.
verb
0
0
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A cured or smoked ham.
noun
0
0
The lower part of a side of bacon.
noun
0
0
To fasten (a bowsprit) to the stem of a ship.
verb
0
0
The bottom end of a side of bacon.
noun
0
0
A smoked or cured ham or side of bacon.
noun
0
0
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(backgammon) A victory in which the winner gets rid of all pieces before his or her opponent gets rid of any.
noun
0
0
To defeat by scoring a gammon.
verb
0
0
To secure (the bowsprit) to the stem of a vessel.
verb
0
0
Nonsense intended to deceive; humbug.
noun
0
0
To talk humbug (to)
verb
0
0
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To deceive or mislead.
verb
0
0
The lower or hind part of a side of bacon.
noun
0
0
To cure bacon by salting.
verb
0
0
(backgammon) A victory in backgammon achieved when the opponent has not taken a single stone; (also, rarely, backgammon, the game itself).
noun
0
0
(backgammon) To beat by a gammon (without the opponent taking a stone).
verb
0
0
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(nautical) A rope fastening a bowsprit to the stem of a ship (usually called a gammoning).
noun
0
0
To lash with ropes (on a ship).
verb
0
0
(dated) Chatter, ridiculous nonsense.

noun
0
0
(colloquial, dated) To deceive, to lie plausibly.
verb
0
0
(Ireland) The Shelta or Cant language of the Irish Travelling Community.
pronoun
0
0
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
gammon
Plural:
gammons

Origin of gammon

  • Middle English gambon from Old North French from gambe leg from Late Latin gamba hoof gambol

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Middle English gamen, gammen game from Old English gamen

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French gambon (compare modern French jambon (“ham”)), from gambe, from Late Latin *gamba.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps related to the first etymology, with reference to tying up a ham.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably a special use of Middle English gamen (“game”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps a special use of the word from etymology 2.

    From Wiktionary