Guilt meaning

gĭlt
The definition of guilt is a feeling that you have done something wrong or bad or let someone down, or the state of having broken a law.

When you feel bad about lying to your husband, this is an example of a time when you feel guilt.

When you are arrested and you are sent to prison after a trial, this is an example of a time when a prosecutor has proved your guilt.

noun
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To guilt is defined as to try to make someone feel bad or coerce someone into doing something by making him feel bad.

When you tell your friend over and over how sad and disappointed you will be if she does not come to your party, this is an example of a time when you try to guilt her into coming to your party.

verb
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Conduct that involves guilt; crime; sin.
noun
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A painful emotion experienced when one believes one's actions or thoughts have violated a moral or personal standard.

Guilt for not having helped the injured animal.

noun
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To make or try to make someone feel guilty.

Guilted me for forgetting to wash the dishes.

verb
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To cause someone to do something by arousing feelings of guilt.

Guilted me into washing the dishes.

verb
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noun
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Awareness of having done wrong.
noun
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The fact of having done wrong.
noun
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(law) The state of having been found guilty or admitted guilt in legal proceedings.
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To cause someone to feel guilt, particularly in order to influence their behaviour.

He didn't want to do it, but his wife guilted him into it.

verb
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To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty.
verb
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The state of having done a wrong or committed an offense; culpability, legal or ethical.
noun
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A painful feeling of self-reproach resulting from a belief that one has done something wrong or immoral.
noun
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Origin of guilt

  • Middle English gilt from Old English gylt crime
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English gilt, gult, from Old English gylt (“guilt, sin, offense, crime, fault”), of obscure origin. Perhaps connected with Old English ġieldan (“to yield, pay, pay for, reward, requite, render, worship, serve, sacrifice to, punish”). See yield.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English gilten, gylten, from Old English gyltan (“to commit sin, be guilty”), from gylt (“guilt, sin, offense, crime, fault”).
    From Wiktionary