Greave meaning

grēv
A piece of armor worn below the knee to protect the front of the leg.
noun
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Armor for the leg from the ankle to the knee.
noun
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(obsolete) A bush; a tree; a grove.

noun
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(obsolete) A bough; a branch.
noun
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(obsolete) A ditch or trench.
noun
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A piece of armour that protects the leg, especially the shin.
noun
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(nautical) To clean (a ship's bottom); to grave.
verb
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Origin of greave

  • Sing. of Middle English greves from Old French shins

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English greve, greyve, from Old English grǣfa, grēfa (“pit, cave, hole, grave, trench”), from Proto-Germanic *grōbō (“pit, ditch”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (“to dig, scratch, scrape”). Cognate with North Frisian groop (“pit, sewer, gutter”), Dutch groef (“pit, hole, gutter”), German Grube (“pit, hole”), Icelandic gröf (“pit, grave”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English greve, from Old English grǣfe, grǣfa (“bush, bramble, grove, thicket, copse, brush-wood (for burning), fuel”), from Proto-Germanic *grainiz (“twig”), of unknown origin. Cognate with Old Norse grein (“branch, bough”), Old English grāf, grāfa (“grove”). See grove.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English greve, grayve, from Old French greve (“shin”), of unknown origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • From greaves, animal fat.

    From Wiktionary