Glue definition

glo͝o
An adhesive force or factor.

Idealism was the glue that held our group together.

noun
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To cause to be focused on or directed at something.

Our eyes were glued to the stage.

verb
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A hard, brittle gelatin made by boiling animal skins, bones, hoofs, etc. to a jelly: when heated in water, it forms a sticky, viscous liquid used to stick things together.
noun
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To cause something to adhere closely to; to follow attentively.

His eyes were glued to the screen.

verb
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A strong liquid adhesive obtained by boiling collagenous animal parts such as bones, hides, and hooves into hard gelatin and then adding water.
noun
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Any of various similar adhesives, such as paste, mucilage, or epoxy.
noun
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To stick, fasten, or cause to adhere.

Glued the broken leg of the chair together.

verb
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Any of various similar adhesive preparations made from casein, resin, etc.
noun
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To make stick with or as with glue.
verb
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To make fixed or focused.

Glued to the TV all morning.

verb
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Software that provides some conversion, translation or other process that makes one system work with another. For example, an application adapter reformats the data into a form available to another application and vice versa. A CGI script sits between the browser and the database, enabling search requests to be passed to the database. "Glue" or "glue software" are terms that can be widely used to reference small programs or scripts needed to integrate applications or tie subsystems together. See application integration, integration server and middleware. See also glue chip.
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A hard gelatin made by boiling bones and hides, used in solution as an adhesive; or any sticky adhesive substance.
noun
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To join or attach something using glue.

I need to glue the chair-leg back into place.

verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
glue
Plural:
glues

Origin of glue

  • Middle English glu from Old French from Late Latin glūs glūt- from Latin glūten

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French glu (now ‘birdlime’), from Late Latin glus, glut-, from Latin gluten.

    From Wiktionary