Evacuate meaning

ĭ-văk'yo͝o-āt'
To excrete or discharge waste matter from (the bowel, for example).
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To excrete waste matter from the body.
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To make empty; remove the contents of; specif., to remove air from so as to make a vacuum.
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To discharge (bodily waste, esp. feces)
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To withdraw, as from a besieged town or area of danger.
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To discharge bodily waste, esp. feces.
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To excrete or discharge waste matter from the body.
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To leave or withdraw from; to quit; to retire from; as, soldiers from a country, city, or fortress.

The firefighters told us to evacuate the area as the flames approached.

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To make empty; to empty out; to remove the contents of, including to create a vacuum; as, to evacuate a vessel or dish.

The scientist evacuated the chamber before filling it with nitrogen.

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(figuratively) To make empty; to deprive.
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To remove; to eject; to void; to discharge, as the contents of a vessel, or of the bowels.
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To make void; to nullify; to vacate.

To evacuate a contract or marriage.

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To withdraw from or vacate a place or area, especially as a protective measure.

The mayor urged the residents to evacuate before the hurricane struck.

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Origin of evacuate

  • Middle English evacuaten to expel (excessive or morbid humors) from the body (according to medieval theories of physiology) from Latin ēvacuāre ēvacuāt- to empty out ē-, ex- ex- vacuus empty (from vacāre to be empty euə- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin evacuare.
    From Wiktionary