Embark meaning

ĕm-bärk
To begin a journey.
verb
18
0
To go aboard a vessel or aircraft, as at the start of a journey.
verb
7
5
To set out on a venture; commence.

Embark on a world tour.

verb
5
4
To embark is defined as to leave on a trip, often on a ship or airplane.

An example of embark is to leave on a cruise.

verb
4
4
To make a beginning; start.

To embark on a new career.

verb
1
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To put or take (passengers or goods) aboard a ship, aircraft, etc.
verb
1
2
To enlist (a person or persons) or invest (capital) in an enterprise.
verb
1
4
To go aboard a ship, aircraft, etc.
verb
0
0
To get on a boat or ship or (outside the USA) an aeroplane.

All passengers please embark now.

verb
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To start, begin.

Phil embarked on his journey yesterday.

verb
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To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.
verb
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To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair.

He embarked his fortune in trade.

verb
0
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To embark is defined as to start something.

An example of to embark is to sign a contract for a new job.

verb
0
1
To engage (a person) or invest (money, etc.) in an enterprise.
verb
0
1
To cause to board a vessel or aircraft.

Stopped to embark passengers.

verb
0
2
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Origin of embark

  • French embarquer from Late Old French probably from Medieval Latin imbarcāre Latin in- in- barca boat bark3

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from Middle French embarquer, from em- + barque (“small ship”). Compare with Portuguese embarcar, Spanish abarcar.

    From Wiktionary