Drizzle meaning

drĭzəl
A fine, gentle, misty rain.
noun
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To let fall in fine, mistlike drops.
verb
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(cooking) To drip or pour (a liquid) in a fine stream onto (a food)
verb
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To rain in fine, mistlike drops.
verb
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Drizzle is defined as to fall in fine drops, or to pour liquid in a thin stream.

An example of drizzle is for the rain to fall in small, mist-like drops.

An example of drizzle is to pour a thin line of olive oil over vegetables that you're roasting.

verb
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The definition of a drizzle is a light rain or mist.

An example of a drizzle is a rain that puts many little drops on your windshield.

noun
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To rain gently in fine, mistlike drops.
verb
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To let fall in fine drops or particles.

Drizzled melted butter over the asparagus.

verb
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To moisten with fine drops.

Drizzled the asparagus with melted butter.

verb
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A fine, mistlike rain.
noun
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(intransitive) To rain lightly; to shed slowly in minute drops or particles.
verb
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(cooking) To pour slowly and evenly, especially with oil in cooking.

The recipe says to toss the salad and then drizzle it in olive oil.

The recipe says to toss the salad and then drizzle olive oil on it.

verb
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(slang) To urinate.
verb
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Light rain.
noun
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(physics, weather). Very small, numerous, and uniformly dispersed water drops, mist, or sprinkle. Unlike fog droplets, drizzle falls to the ground. It is sometimes accompanied by low visibility and fog.

No longer pouring, the rain outside slowed down to a faint drizzle.

noun
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(slang) Water.

Stop drinking all of my drizzle!

noun
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Origin of drizzle

  • Perhaps from Middle English drisning fall of dew from Old English -drysnian (in gedrysnian to pass away, vanish) dhreu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps a back-formation from dryseling, a dissimilated variant of Middle English drysning (“a falling of dew”), from Old English drysnan (“to extinguish”), related to Old English drēosan (“to fall, to decline”), making it cognate to modern English droze and drowse.

    From Wiktionary