Diabetes meaning

dī'ə-bē'tĭs, -tēz
Type 2 diabetes - happens when either the pancreas is not making enough insulin or the body has grown resistant to it and the cells can’t use the glucose.
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Gestational diabetes - occurs when a woman is pregnant and is caused from certain hormones that are present during pregnancy.
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Infection – Straphylococci is supposedly responsible for causing infection in the pancreas thus affecting insulin production.
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Age – 80% of diabetes cases occur after the age of 50.
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Malnutrition or poor diet – Lack of nutrition, low intake of fiber and protein, plus the high intake of processed and refined food products are major reasons for diabetes.
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Obesity – Too much fat in your body can make the cells resistant to the insulin.
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Inactive Lifestyle – Those who have sedentary lifestyles are more likely to have diabetes.
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Stress – Emotional or physical disturbances can change the glucose levels and affect your metabolism.
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Drugs – There are several drugs that are known to potentially induce diabetes including Quetiapine (Seroquel), clozapine (Clozaril), ziprasidone (Geodon), risperidone (Risperdal), and olanzapine (Zyprexa)
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Gender – Diabetes is more common in elderly men or women with multiple pregnancies or those suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.
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Hypertension – Studies have shown that high blood pressure is directly related to diabetes.
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Lipoproteins and Serum lipids – High cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood are connected to high blood sugar levels.
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25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—had diabetes as of 2011.
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79 million people are prediabetic.
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Diabetes contributed to over 230,000 deaths in the U.S. in 2007.
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Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes.
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Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness among adults aged 20–74.
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Diabetes is the leading cause of renal failure.
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Symptoms of diabetes include thirst, weight loss, tiredness, hunger and frequent urination.
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Treatment of diabetes includes insulin, either in injections or pill form.

An example of diabetes is when your body can't produce enough insulin on its own, and eating too much sugar makes your blood sugar spike.

An example of diabetes is Type 1 diabetes (when the body does not have the capacity to produce enough insulin) which accounts for around 10% of the total diabetics in the U.S.

An example of diabetes is Type 2 diabetes (when the body does not use insulin properly), which accounts for 90% of the the diabetics in the U.S., is typically brought on by a lifetime of poor health decisions.

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Diabetes mellitus.
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Diabetes insipidus.
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Any of various diseases characterized by an excessive discharge of urine; esp., diabetes mellitus.
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Any of a group of diseases characterized by high blood sugar levels caused by insufficient production of insulin, impaired response to insulin, or both, especially:
  • Type 1 diabetes.
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • Gestational diabetes.
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A group of metabolic diseases whereby a person (other animal) has high blood sugar due to an inability to produce, or inability to metabolize, sufficient quantities of the hormone insulin.
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Diabetes insipidus, a condition characterized by excessive thirst and excretion of large amounts of severely diluted urine.
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Diabetes (diabetes mellitus) is defined as a metabolic disorder that causes your body to be unable to properly produce insulin and regulate its blood sugar levels.
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Type 1 diabetes - comes from some type of immunological event that destroys the inability of the pancreas to secrete insulin.
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Heredity - a person can be genetically predisposed to diabetes.
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Origin of diabetes

  • Middle English diabete from Medieval Latin diabētēs from Latin from Greek siphon, diabetes from diabainein to cross over, straddle dia- dia- bainein to go gwā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From the Ancient Greek διαβαίνω (diabainō, “to pass through”), via the participle διαβήτης (diabētēs, “passing through”). This refers to the excessive amounts of urine produced by sufferers.
    From Wiktionary