Depose definition

dĭ-pōz
(law) To take a deposition from.

Investigators will depose the witness behind closed doors.

verb
8
2
To remove from office or a position of power, esp. from a throne; oust.
verb
3
1
Depose is defined as to forcefully and suddenly remove someone from office, or to testify or present evidence under oath in a legal proceeding.

When you overthrow the government and the military dictator is tossed out of office, this is an example of when you depose the dictator.

When you witness a crime and the defense attorney and prosecutor question you under oath to find out what you will say in court, this is an example of when the prosecutor and attorney depose you.

verb
2
1
To state or testify under oath but out of court.
verb
1
0
To take the deposition of (a witness)
verb
1
0
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To remove from office or power.
verb
0
0
To dethrone.
verb
0
0
To give testimony by affidavit or deposition.
verb
0
0
(literally) To put down; to lay down; to deposit; to lay aside; to put away.
verb
0
0
To remove (a leader) from (high) office, without killing the incumbent.

A deposed monarch may go into exile as pretender to the lost throne, hoping to be restored in a subsequent revolution.

verb
0
0
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(intransitive) To take or swear an oath.
verb
0
0
To testify; to bear witness; to claim; to assert; to affirm.
verb
0
0
(archaic) To lay down.
verb
0
1
To bear witness.
verb
0
1
(law, intransitive) To give evidence or testimony, especially in response to interrogation during a deposition.
verb
0
1
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(law) To interrogate and elicit testimony from during a deposition; typically done by a lawyer.

After we deposed the claimant we had enough evidence to avoid a trial.

verb
0
1
To take a person’s deposition; to make a written, sworn statement, such as an affidavit.
verb
0
2

Origin of depose

  • Middle English deposen from Old French deposer alteration (influenced by poser to put) of Latin dēpōnere to put down depone

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded since c.1300, from Old French deposer, from de- "down" + poser "to put, place". Deposition (1494 in the legal sense) belongs to deposit, but that related word and depose became totally confused

    From Wiktionary