Clamor meaning

klămər
The definition of clamor is loud and often unpleasant or chaotic noise.

An example of clamor is a group of people shouting.

noun
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To make a loud sustained noise or outcry.
verb
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A vehement, continued expression of the general feeling or of public opinion; loud demand or complaint.
noun
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To make insistent demands or complaints.

Clamored for tax reforms.

verb
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To exclaim insistently and noisily.

The representatives clamored their disapproval.

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To influence or force by clamoring.

Clamored the mayor into resigning.

verb
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A loud outcry; uproar.
noun
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A loud, sustained noise.
noun
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To make a clamor; cry out, demand, or complain noisily.
verb
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To express with, or bring about by, clamor.
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noun
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Any loud and continued noise.
noun
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noun
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(intransitive) To cry out and/or demand.

Anyone who tastes our food seems to clamor for more.

verb
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To demand by outcry.

Thousands of demonstrators clamoring the government's resignation were literally deafening, yet their cries fell in deaf ears.

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(intransitive) To become noisy insistently.

After a confused murmur the audience soon clamored.

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His many supporters successfully clamor his election without a formal vote.

verb
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Clamor is defined as to make a loud request or to cry out in protest.

An example of clamor is a crowd of people demanding an encore.

verb
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A loud noise or outcry; a hubbub.
noun
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A vehement expression of discontent or protest.

A clamor in the press for pollution control.

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Origin of clamor

  • Middle English clamour from Old French from Latin clāmor shout from clāmāre to cry out kelə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded in English since c. 1385, from Old French clamor (modern clameur), from Latin clāmor (“a shout, cry”), from clāmō (“cry out, complain”); the sense to silence may have a distinct (unknown) etymology.

    From Wiktionary