Yammer meaning

yămər
The definition of a yammer is a loud, sustained and repetitive noise.

The loud and repetitive sounds of conversation two tables over that keeps going on and on is an example of yammer.

noun
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To yammer is defined as to talk on and on, to complain or to make loud repetitive noises.

When you go on and on about your past vacation and no one is really listening or caring, this is an example of when you yammer.

verb
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To talk volubly and often loudly.
verb
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To complain peevishly; whine.
verb
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To utter or say loudly or in a complaining tone.
verb
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The act of yammering.
noun
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To whine, whimper, or complain.
verb
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To shout, yell, clamor, etc.
verb
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To talk loudly or continually.
verb
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To say loudly and fretfully.
verb
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The act of yammering, or something yammered.
noun
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A private social networking service for businesses. Launched in late 2008, Yammer lets companies create their own social network site for employees as well as customers. Private groups within the company can also be organized. Access is available via a desktop application, the Web, email, instant and text messaging, as well as smartphones. In 2012, Yammer was acquired by Microsoft. For more information, visit www.yammer.com. See Twitter.
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(intransitive) To complain peevishly.
verb
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(intransitive) To talk loudly and persistently.
verb
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To repeat on and on, usually loudly or in complaint.
verb
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(intransitive, rare) To make an outcry; to clamor.
verb
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The act or noise of yammering.
noun
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A loud noise.
noun
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One who yammers.
noun
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Origin of yammer

  • Middle English yameren to lament alteration (probably influenced by Middle Dutch jammeren to lament) of earlier Middle English yomeren from Old English gēomrian, gēomerian from gēomer sad, sorrowful akin to Old High German jāmar perhaps ultimately of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Middle Dutch jammeren cognate and reinforced by Middle English yeoumeren (“to mourn, complain"), from Old English geomrian (“to lament"), from Ä¡eōmor (“sorrowful") possibly imitative in origin and akin to German Jammer.

    From Wiktionary