Charles meaning

chärlz
(person) A.d. 823-877; king of France (843-877) &, as Charles II, Holy Roman Emperor (875-877)
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(person) 1368-1422: king of France (1380-1422)
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(person) 1630-85; king of England, Scotland, & Ireland (1660-85)
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(person) 1294-1328; king of France (1322-28)
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(person) 1748-1819; king of Spain (1788-1808): forced to abdicate by Napoleon I.
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(person) 1337-80; king of France (1364-80)
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(person) 1500-58; Holy Roman Emperor (1519-56) &, as Charles I, king of Spain (1516-56): abdicated.
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(person) 1403-61; king of France (1422-61)
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(person) (born Charles Albert) 1697-1745; Holy Roman Emperor (1742-45)
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(person) (born Ray Charles Robinson) 1930-2004; U.S. rhythm-and-blues musician, singer, & composer.
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(place) River in E Mass., flowing into Boston Bay: c. 60 mi (97 km)
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(place) Cape in SE Va., at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, forming the tip of Delmarva Peninsula.
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A male given name.
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A patronymic surname​.
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The eldest son of Elizabeth II and heir to the British throne. He was invested as Prince of Wales in 1969.
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(person, proper) A masculine name: dim. Charley, Charlie, Chuck; var. Carl, Karl; equiv. L. Carolus, Ger. Carl, Karl, It. Carlo, Sp. Carlos, Du. Karel; fem. Charlene, Charlotte, Caroline.
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(born Charles Philip Arthur George) 1948- ; Prince of Wales: son of Elizabeth II.
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(person) (born Charles Stuart) 1600-49; king of England, Scotland, & Ireland (1625-49): beheaded.
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(person) (born Charles Francis Joseph) 1887-1922; emperor of Austria &, as Charles IV, king of Hungary (1916-18): forced to abdicate.
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Origin of charles

  • after Charles I of England: see Charles

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • From the French Charles, from the Old High German Karl, from the Proto-Germanic *karlaz (“person, free man”); compare the English word churl and the German Kerl.

    From Wiktionary