Boy meaning

boi
Frequency:
(offensive) A male servant or employee.
noun
12
4
The definition of a boy is a young male or, when used offensively, a male employee could be referred to as a boy.

An example of a boy is a male child.

noun
11
7
A son.

His youngest boy.

noun
9
5
(often offensive) A man, especially a young man.
noun
5
4
(informal) A man socializing in a group of men.

A night out with the boys.

noun
4
3
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A male child from birth to the age of physical maturity; lad; youth.
noun
2
0
Any man; fellow.
noun
2
0
A young male human; a male child or young adult. [from 15th c.]

The boys were playing kickball in the mud; Steve is a boy of 16

noun
2
0
A man of any age, used as a friendly diminutive, or of a man who is merely younger than the speaker. [from 17th c.]
noun
2
0
(US, slang) Heroin. [from 20th c.]
noun
2
0
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Exclamation of surprise, pleasure or longing.

Boy, that was close!

Boy, that tastes good!

Boy, I wish I could go to Canada!

interjection
2
1
A male child.
noun
1
1
(slang) Used to express pleasure, surprise, etc.
interjection
1
1
(now uncommon and/or offensive) Male servant.
  • (now rare) A male servant, in general senses. [from 14th c.]
  • (historical, now offensive) A non-white male servant, as used especially by whites in a colonial settlement etc. [from 17th c.]
  • (now offensive) A non-white male. [from 19th c.]
noun
1
1
A familiar way of addressing a male dog. [from 19th c.]

Here, boys, heel; yes, Bobby, show the puppies how, good boy!

noun
1
1
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To use the word boy to refer to someone.

Don't boy me!

verb
1
1
To act as a boy (in allusion to the former practice of boys acting women's parts on the stage)
verb
1
1
A bellboy, messenger boy, etc.
noun
1
2
Used to express mild astonishment, elation, or disgust.

Oh boy—what a surprise!

interjection
0
1
A man regarded as immature or callow.
noun
0
1
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A male domestic worker or servant.
noun
0
1
(informal) A son.

Mrs. Dill's oldest boy.

noun
0
1
A son.
noun
0
1
(colloquial) A male friend or fellow of some group, community etc. (mainly used in the plural). [from 19th c.]

I’m going out for a few drinks with the boys; me and my boy grew up together in Southside.

noun
0
1

Origin of boy

  • Middle English boi male servant, churl, young male possibly from Old French embuié person in fetters from past participle of embuier to fetter from buie fetter, shackle from Latin bōia collar or yoke used to restrain criminals probably from Greek boeiā (dorā) (skin) of an ox, an ox hide (such restraints being made from ox hide) from feminine of boeios of an ox or oxen, of ox hide from bous ox gwou- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English boy, boye (“servant, commoner, knave, boy”), from Old English *bōia (“boy”), from Proto-Germanic *bōjô (“younger brother, young male relation”), from Proto-Germanic *bō- (“brother, close male relation”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰā-, *bʰāt- (“father, elder brother, brother”). Cognate with Scots boy (“boy”), Eastern Frisian boi (“boy, young gentleman”), West Frisian boai (“boy”), Middle Dutch boi, booi (“boy”), Low German Boi (“boy”), and probably to the Old English proper name Bōia. Also related to West Flemish boe (“brother”), Norwegian dialectal boa (“brother”), Dutch boef (“rogue, knave”), German dialectal Bube (“boy, lad, knave”), Icelandic bófi (“rogue, crook, bandit, knave”). See also bully.

    From Wiktionary