Barn meaning

bärn
Frequency:
A large farm building used for storing farm products and sheltering livestock.
noun
5
1
A large shed for the housing of vehicles, such as railroad cars.
noun
5
3
A unit of area equal to 10−24 square centimeters, used to measure cross sections in nuclear physics.
noun
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3
(nuclear physics) A unit of surface area equal to 10-28 square metres.
noun
4
2
The definition of a barn is a building separate from a main house, traditionally used for storing farm animals, equipment, or grain.

A place where chickens live and hay is stacked up is an example of a barn.

noun
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1
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A particularly large, typically bare building.

Lived in a barn of a country house.

noun
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0
A farm building for sheltering harvested crops, livestock, machines, etc.
noun
1
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A large building for streetcars, trucks, etc.
noun
1
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A unit of area used to show the degree of probability that a nuclear reaction will occur: 1 barn = a magnitude of 10-24 sq cm per nucleus: abbrev. b.
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1
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(agriculture) A building, often found on a farm, used for storage or keeping animals such as cattle.
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(informal, Canada, ice hockey) An arena.

Maple Leaf Gardens was a grand old barn.

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To lay up in a barn.

verb
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(dialect, parts of Northern England) A child.
noun
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0

Origin of barn

  • Middle English bern from Old English berærn bere barley bhares- in Indo-European roots ærn house

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bern, from Old English bereærn 'barn, granary', compound of bere 'barley' and ærn, ræn 'dwelling, barn', from Proto-Germanic *razną (cf. Old High German erin, Old Norse rann), from pre-Germanic -, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₁- 'to rest'. More at rest and barley.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English barn, bern, from Old English bearn (“child, son, offspring, prodigy”) and Old Norse barn (“child”). More at bairn.

    From Wiktionary