Atrium meaning

ātrē-əm
A body cavity or chamber, especially either of the upper chambers of the heart that receives blood from the veins and forces it into a ventricle.
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The definition of an atrium is a body cavity, specifically relating to the heart’s chambers which take in blood.

When a person has open-heart surgery to repair a blockage in an artery which gives blood to the heart, it is an example of surgery on their atrium.

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The central court or main room of an ancient Roman house.
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A hall or court at the center or entrance of a building, usually rising through more than one story or all the stories and having a skylight or glass on one side and the roof.
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Atrium is defined as a patio, rectangular in shape and open to the elements, attached to a house or is a courtyard, usually located in the center of a building with several floors, and typically has a skylight at the very top.

An example of an atrium is the outdoor patio located off the kitchen of a house and accessed through sliding glass doors.

An example of an atrium is an area of benches and plants located in the center of a multi-leveled shopping mall with a skylight at the top.

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A chamber or cavity, esp. either of the thin-walled upper chambers of the heart that receive blood; auricle.
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A body cavity or chamber, especially either of the upper chambers of the heart that receives blood from the veins and forces it into a ventricle.
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A chamber of the heart that receives blood from the veins and forces it by muscular contraction into a ventricle. Mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians have two atria; fish have one.
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(architecture) A central room or space in ancient Roman homes, open to the sky in the middle; a similar space in other buildings.
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(architecture) A square hall lit by daylight from above, into which rooms open at one or more levels.
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(anatomy) Any enclosed sexine and nexine layers, widening toward the interior of the grain.
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A rectangular court, as:
  • A usually skylighted central area, often containing plants, in some modern buildings, especially of a public or commercial nature.
  • The open area in the center of an ancient Roman house.
  • The forecourt of a building, such as an early Christian church, enclosed on three or four sides with porticoes.
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Origin of atrium

  • Latin ātrium āter- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin ātrium (“entry hall”), from Etruscan.

    From Wiktionary