Arithmetic definition

ə-rĭthmĭ-tĭk
Frequency:
The mathematics of integers, rational numbers, real numbers, or complex numbers under addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
noun
22
4
Changing according to an arithmetic progression.

The increase in the food supply is arithmetic.

adjective
19
5
Of or relating to arithmetic.
adjective
18
4
The science or art of computing by positive real numbers, specif. by adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing.
noun
9
1
The mathematics of integers, rational numbers, real numbers, or complex numbers under the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
8
2
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The definition of arithmetic refers to working with numbers by doing addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

An example of arithmetic is adding two and two together to make four.

noun
6
1
The mathematics of numbers (integers, rational numbers, real numbers, or complex numbers) under the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
noun
6
1
Knowledge of or skill in this science.

Her arithmetic is poor.

noun
8
5
Of, based on, or using arithmetic.
adjective
7
4
(arithmetic) Of a progression, mean, etc, computed solely using addition.

Arithmetic progression.

adjective
4
1
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(mathematics) Of, relating to, or using arithmetic; arithmetical.

Arithmetic geometry.

adjective
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0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
arithmetic
Plural:
arithmetics

Origin of arithmetic

  • Middle English arsmetike from Old French arismetique from Medieval Latin arismetica alteration of Latin arithmētica from Greek arithmētikē (tekhnē) (art) of counting feminine of arithmētikos from arithmein to count from arithmos number ar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English arsmetike, from Old French arismetique, from Latin arithmetica, from Ancient Greek ἀριθμητική (arithmētikē, “counting”) (τέχνη (tekhnē, “art”)), from ἀριθμός (arithmos, “number”). Used in English since 13th Century.

    From Wiktionary