Alum meaning

ăləm
Frequency:
Any of various double sulfates of a trivalent metal such as aluminum, chromium, or iron and a univalent metal such as potassium or sodium, especially hydrous aluminum potassium sulfate, AlK(SO4 )2 · 12H2 O, widely used in industry as clarifiers, hardeners, and purifiers and medicinally as topical astringents and styptics.
noun
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An alumna or alumnus.
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A double sulfate of a monovalent metal or radical (as sodium, potassium, or ammonium) with a trivalent metal (as aluminum, iron, or chromium): it is used as an astringent, as an emetic, and in the manufacture of baking powders, dyes, and paper: the most common form is potash alum (potassium aluminum sulfate), KAl(SO4)212H2O.
noun
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Aluminum sulfate.
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Any of various double sulfates of a trivalent metal such as aluminum, chromium, or iron and a univalent metal such as potassium or sodium, especially hydrous aluminum potassium sulfate, AlK(SO4 )2 · 12H2 O, widely used in industry as clarifiers, hardeners, and purifiers and medicinally as topical astringents and styptics.
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Any of various crystalline double salts of a trivalent metal (such as aluminum, chromium, or iron) and a monovalent metal (such as potassium or sodium), especially aluminum potassium sulfate. Alum is widely used in industry as a hardener and purifier, and in medicine as an emetic and to stop bleeding.
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(chemistry) Any similar double sulphate in which either or both of the potassium and aluminium is wholly or partly replaced by other univalent or tervalent cations. [from 17th c.]
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(US) A graduate of a university or other institution.
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An astringent salt, usually occurring in the form of pale crystals, much used in the dyeing and tanning trade and in certain medicines, and now understood to be a double sulphate of potassium and aluminium (K2SO4.Al2(SO4)3.24H2O). [from 14th c.]
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To steep in, or otherwise impregnate with, a solution of alum; to treat with alum.

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Origin of alum

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin alūmen

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman alum, alume et al., Middle French allume, from Latin alūmen (“alumen”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From alumnus and alumna, by removal of the non-native, gender-specific endings.

    From Wiktionary