Age meaning

āj
Age is defined as a span of years during which some event occurred.

The number of years that ice covered most of the world is an example of an ice age.

noun
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Age means to experience the passage of time or show signs of growing older.

To allow wine to ferment and develop its flavor over a certain number of years is an example of the process used to age wine.

An example of age is a person who grows from 15 years old to 60 years old.

verb
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The definition of age is the number of years something has been alive or in existence.

An example of age is being 16 years old.

noun
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(informal) An extended period of time.

Left ages ago.

noun
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The time that a person or a thing has existed since birth or beginning.
noun
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To cause to mature or ripen under controlled conditions.

Aging wine.

verb
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To change (the characteristics of a device) through use, especially to stabilize (an electronic device).
verb
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To become old or show signs of becoming old.

Who doesn't want to age gracefully?

verb
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To develop a certain quality of ripeness; become mature.

Cheese aging at room temperature.

verb
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Residence or place of.

Vicarage.

suffix
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(informal) A long time.
noun
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The condition of being old; old age.

Wearied with age.

noun
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To grow old or show signs of growing old.
verb
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To ripen or become mature.
verb
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To make, or make seem, old or mature.
verb
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To cause to ripen or become mature over a period of time under fixed conditions.

To age cheese.

verb
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The age, usually determined by statute, at which a person becomes legally capable of becoming a party to a contract, executing a testamentary document (such as a trust or will), initiate a lawsuit without a guardian, and so on. See capacity.
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Condition; state.

Vagabondage.

suffix
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Charge or fee.

Cartage.

suffix
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A generation.
noun
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Act, condition, or result of.

Marriage, cleavage, usage.

affix
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Amount or number of.

Acreage.

affix
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Cost of.

Postage.

affix
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Place of.

Steerage.

affix
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Collection of.

Peerage, rootage.

affix
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Home of.

Hermitage.

affix
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A period of time, especially one marking the time of existence or the duration of life.
noun
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The age, usually determined by statute, below which a person may not marry without parental consent. See also consent.
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The age, usually determined by statute, below which a person is legally incapable of consenting to sexual intercourse. See consent and rape.
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The age, usually determined by statute, at which a person attains full civil, legal, and political rights. See also age of consent.
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The age, usually determined by statute, below which a child cannot be legally capable of committing a crime.
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The age, usually determined by statute or case law, below which a child cannot be legally capable of committing a tort.
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The age, usually determined by statute, at which a person becomes legally capable to exercise a specific right or privilege or to assume a specific responsibility. For example, in many states, a person may legally drive an automobile once she is 16 years of age, but has to wait until she is 21 to legally drink alcohol.
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The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind; lifetime.
noun
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(uncountable) That part of the duration of a being or a thing which is between its beginning and any given time; specifically the size of that part.

What is the present age of a man, or of the earth?

noun
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(uncountable) The latter part of life; an advanced period of life, eld; seniority; state of being old.

Wisdom doesn't necessarily come with age, sometimes age just shows up all by itself.

noun
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(countable) One of the stages of life; as, the age of infancy, of youth, etc.
noun
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(uncountable) Mature age; especially, the time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities.

To come of age; he (she) is of age.

noun
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(countable) The time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested.

The age of consent; the age of discretion.

noun
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(countable) A particular period of time in history, as distinguished from others.

The golden age; the age of Pericles.

noun
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(countable) A great period in the history of the Earth.

The Bronze Age was followed by the Iron Age; the Tithonian Age was the last in the Late Jurassic epoch.

noun
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(countable) A century; the period of one hundred years.
noun
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The people who live at a particular period.
noun
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(countable) A generation.

There are three ages living in her house.

noun
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(countable, hyperbolic) A long time.

It's been an age since we last saw you.

noun
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To cause to grow old; to impart the characteristics of age to.

Grief ages us.

verb
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(figuratively) To postpone an action that would extinguish something, as a debt.

Money's a little tight right now, let's age our bills for a week or so.

verb
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(accounting) To categorize by age.

One his first assignments was to age the accounts receivable.

verb
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(intransitive) To grow aged; to become old; to show marks of age.

He grew fat as he aged.

verb
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To cause to become old or to show the signs of becoming old.

The stress of the office visibly aged the president.

verb
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Relationship; connection.

Parentage.

suffix
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1
come of age
  • To reach maturity.
idiom
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of age
  • having reached the age when one has full legal rights
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of age

  • OFr < LL -aticum, belonging to, related to

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French aage from Vulgar Latin aetāticum from Latin aetās aetāt- age aiw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Vulgar Latin -āticum abstract n. suff. from Latin -āticum n. and adj. suff.

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English age, from Anglo-Norman age, from Old French aage, eage (Modern French âge), from assumed unattested Vulgar Latin *aetāticum, from Latin aetātem, accusative form of aetās, from aevum (“lifetime”). Displaced native Middle English elde (“age”) (modern eld; from Old English eldo, ieldo (“age”)).

    From Wiktionary