A-a meaning

One; any indefinite example of; used to denote a singular item of a group. [First attested prior to 1150]

There was a man here looking for you yesterday.

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The first letter of the English alphabet, called a and written in the Latin script.
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The name of the Latin script letter A/a.
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The same; one. [16th Century]

We are of a mind on matters of morals.

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Any, every; used before a noun which has become modified to limit its scope; also used with a negative to indicate not a single one.

A man who dies intestate leaves his children troubles and difficulties.

He fell all that way, and hasn't a bump on his head?

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Used before plural nouns modified by few, good many, couple, great many, etc.
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Someone or something like; similar to; Used before a proper noun to create an example out of it.

The center of the village was becoming a Times Square.

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(archaic) To do with position or direction; In, on, at, by, towards, onto. [First attested before 1150]

Stand a tiptoe.

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To do with separation; In, into. [First attested before 1150]

Torn a pieces.

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To do with time; Each, per, in, on, by. [First attested before 1150]

I brush my teeth twice a day.

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To do with status; In. [First attested before 1150]
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(archaic) To do with process, with a passive verb; In the course of, experiencing. [First attested before 1150]
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(archaic) To do with an action, an active verb; Engaged in. [16th century]
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(archaic) To do with an action/movement; To, into. [16th century]
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​ (archaic or slang) Have. [between 1150 and 1350, continued in some use until 1650; used again after 1950]
  • 1604 (facsimile printed between 1830 and 1910), William Shakespeare, Hamlet.
    So would I a done by yonder ſunne.
    And thou hadſt not come to my bed.

I'd a come, if you'd a asked.

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1874 Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd (Barnes & Noble Classics reprint [reset], 2005, chapter 5, page 117; from "Hardy's 1912 Wessex edition").

"And how Farmer James would cuss, and call thee a fool, wouldn't he, Joseph, when 'a seed his name looking so inside-out-like?" continued Matthew Moon, with feeling. / "Ay — 'a would," said Joseph meekly.

pronoun
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A meaningless syllable; ah.
interjection
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(archaic, slang) Of.

The name of John a Gaunt.

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(chiefly Scotland) All. [First attested from 1350 to 1470.]
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Distance from leading edge to aerodynamic center.
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Specific absorption coefficient.
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Specific rotation.
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Allele (recessive)
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Air-to-air.
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Achievement age.
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Alcoholics anonymous.
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Amino acid.
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initialism
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(military) Initialism of antiaircraft.
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(military) Initialism of antiaircraft.
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Alternative form of aa.
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Used in conjunction with the adjectives score, dozen, hundred, thousand, and million, as a function word.

I've seen it happen a hundred times.

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One certain or particular; any single. [First attested between around 1150 to 1350]

We've received an interesting letter from a Mrs. Miggins of London.

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Origin of a-a

  • (she): From Middle English a, ha, unstressed variant of heo, hie, hi, from Old English hēo, hīo, feminine of (“he”).

    From Wiktionary

  • (they): From Middle English a, ha, unstressed variant of hie, hi, from Old English hīe, plural of (“he”).

    From Wiktionary

  • (it): From Middle English a, ha, unstressed variant of he, heo, from Old English hit (“it”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English, from Old English ān (“one, a, lone, sole”). The "n" was gradually lost before consonants in almost all dialects by the 15th century.

    From Wiktionary

  • (he): From Middle English a, ha (“he”), unstressed variant of he, from Old English .

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English and Old English lower case letter a and split of Middle English and Old English lower case letter æ.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English a, o, from Old English a-, an, on.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English a, ha contraction of have, or haven

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English (Northern dialect) aw, alteration of all.

    From Wiktionary

  • (I): From Middle English variant of the word I.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, contraction of of.

    From Wiktionary

  • Unstressed form of on.

    From Wiktionary

  • Variant spelling of ah.

    From Wiktionary