Xml meaning

ĕksĕm-ĕl
XML and HTML are complimentary markup languages used for the presentation of data to the WWW. HTML is a language that describes how information is displayed on the screen in your web browser and XML describes how data is organized, stored and retrieved from memory. XML is simply text. There are no calculations done nor any type of display of information taking place. XML files simply assign tags to data that will be meaningful to the application that needs access to a specific set of data. By writing XML files for specific tasks and for specific types of data, many data files can be imported to an application for manipulation. The resulting data can then be displayed based on a HTML style sheet.
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An international standard metalanguage for creating markup languages that structure digital information in a way that allows for the exchange, display, and storage of data independent of proprietary operating systems and hardware devices.
noun
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Extensible Markup Language.
abbreviation
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Short for extensible markup language . A version of SGML that allows one to design a customized markup language, used to allow for the easy interchange of documents and data on the World Wide Web or between software components.
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(EXtensible Markup Language) The most widely used semi-structured format for data, introduced by the W3C in 1998. XML files contain only tags and text similar to HTML. However, whereas HTML defines how elements are displayed and printed, XML assigns meaning to the elements. HTML uses predefined tags, but XML requires the developer of the content to define most of the tags. Thus, just like database records, virtually any data items, such as "product," "sales rep" and "amount due," can be specified.By providing a common method for identifying data, XML supports business-to-business transactions and has become "the" format for electronic data interchange and Web services.XML Is Only a FormatWhen introduced, XML was hyped as the panacea for e-commerce, but it was only a first step. The human-readable XML tags provide a simple format, but the intelligent defining of these tags to serve business needs properly and everyone's compliance in using the same tags determine XML's real value. Countless vocabularies have been developed for vertical applications; so many in fact, that a universal language was developed to provide a standard for interoperability between them (see UBL). See XML vocabulary, Web services, SOA and EDI).XML Documents Can Define ThemselvesAn XML document can include a self-describing set of rules that identify the tags and their relationships; for example, only one XYZ tag is allowed within an ABC tag, or there must be one XYZ tag within every ABC tag and so forth. See XML schema.More Rigid than HTMLUnlike HTML, which uses a rather loose coding style and is more tolerant of coding errors, XML pages have to be "well formed" and comply with the rules. See XSLT, DTD, DOM, XHTML, JSON, HTML, SGML, SMIL and XML-RPC.
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A language used by Web developers and designers for creating declarative markup languages like Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), only more flexible in that documents written in XML can be shared across different information systems, particularly the Internet, and can adapt to different presentation style sheets and applications. A condensed form of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), XML is published and maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). See also W3C and Web. G.992.3, G.992.4 (2002) Max RateUpstreamMax RateDownstreamITU-T Standard.
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Origin of xml

  • Ex(tensible) M(arkup) L(anguage)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition