Waltz meaning

wôlts, wôls
To dance the waltz.
verb
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A ballroom dance in 3/4 time.
noun
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(informal) Something that presents no difficulties and can be accomplished with little effort.
noun
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(informal) To move with self-assuredness or indifference.

Always waltzes into the office 30 minutes late.

verb
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(informal) To accomplish a task, chore, or assignment with little effort.

Waltzed through the exams.

verb
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To dance the waltz with.
verb
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(informal) To lead or force to move in a self-assured or purposeful manner; march.

Waltzed them into the principal's office.

verb
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A ballroom dance for couples, in moderate 3/4 time with marked accent on the first beat of the measure.
noun
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Music for this dance or in its characteristic rhythm.
noun
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(informal) A thing easy to do; esp., an easy victory in a contest.
noun
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Of, for, or characteristic of a waltz.
adjective
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To dance a waltz.
verb
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To move lightly and nimbly; whirl.
verb
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To dance with in a waltz.
verb
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To take and lead peremptorily.
verb
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A piece of music for this dance (in triple time).
noun
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(informal) A simple task.
noun
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(intransitive) To dance the waltz (with).

They waltzed for twenty-one hours and seventeen minutes straight, setting a record.

While waltzing her around the room, he stepped on her toes only once.

verb
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(informal) To accomplish a task with little effort.
verb
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(intransitive) To move briskly and unhesitatingly.

He waltzed into the room like he owned the place.

You can't just waltz him in here without documentation!

verb
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To move with fanfare.
verb
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(australian) waltz Matilda
  • To travel about, especially on foot, carrying a swag.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of waltz

  • German Walzer from walzen to turn about from Middle High German to roll from Old High German walzan wel-2 in Indo-European roots Idiom, from Matilda

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • German Walzer, from walzen (“to dance"), from Old High German walzan (“to turn"), from Proto-Germanic *walt- (“to turn"), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (“to turn").

    From Wiktionary