Turtle meaning

tûr'tl
Any of various members of this order that live in fresh or brackish water, in contrast to the terrestrial tortoises.
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A sea turtle.
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To hunt for turtles, especially as an occupation.
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To capsize.
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The flesh of certain turtles, used for food.
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A turtledove.
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Any of a large and widely distributed order (Testudines) of terrestrial or aquatic reptiles having a toothless beak and a soft body encased in a tough shell into which, in most species, the head, tail, and four legs may be withdrawn.
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The flesh of some turtles, used as food.
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To hunt for turtles.
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Any land or marine reptile of the order Testudines, characterised by a protective shell enclosing its body.
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(Australia, UK) A sea turtle.
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(military) An Ancient Roman attack method, where the shields held by the soldiers hide them, not only left, right, front and back, but also from above.
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(computing) A type of robot having a domed case (so resembling the reptile), used in education, especially for making line drawings by means of a computer program.
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(computing) An on-screen cursor that serves the same function as a turtle for drawing.
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(printing, historical) The curved plate in which the form is held in a type-revolving cylinder press.
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To flip over onto the back or top; to turn upside down.
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To turn and swim upside down.
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To hunt turtles, especially in the water.
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(video games) To build up a large defense force and strike only punctually, rather than going for an offensive strategy.
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The definition of a turtle is an aquatic reptile and is a member of the order Testudines or Chelonia.

An example of a turtle is a sea turtle.

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A turtleneck.
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(now rare, archaic) A turtle dove.
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turn turtle
  • To turn upside down; capsize.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of turtle

  • Alteration (influenced by turtle) of Middle English tortu from Old French tortue ultimately (probably with influence from Old French tortu crooked) (and tordu twisted, from the shape of its legs) from Vulgar Latin tartarūca feminine of *tartarūcus of Tartarus (the turtle being a symbol of the forces of darkness in early Christian iconography) from Late Latin tartarūchus from Late Greek tartaroukhos occupying Tartarus Tartaros Tartarus ekhein to hold eunuch
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English from Latin turtur probably of imitative origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Modification of French tortue (probably under the influence of turtledove). See tortoise for more.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English turtla, ultimately from Latin turtur (“turtledove"), of imitative origin.
    From Wiktionary