Translate meaning

trănslāt, trănz-, trăns-lāt, trănz-
To express in different, often simpler words.

Translated the technical jargon into ordinary language.

verb
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To forward or retransmit (a telegraphic message).
verb
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To render in another language.

Translated the Korean novel into German.

verb
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To admit of translation.

His poetry translates well.

verb
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To subject messenger RNA to translation.
verb
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(1) To change one language into another; for example, assemblers, compilers and interpreters translate source language into machine language.
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To change text (of a book, document, movie, etc.) from one language to another.

Hans diligently translated the novel from German into English.

verb
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(intransitive) To have a translation into another language.

That idiom doesn't readily translate.

"Dog" translates as "chien" in French.

verb
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To change from one form or medium to another.

The renowned director could translate experience to film with ease.

verb
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(intransitive) To change from one form to another.

An excellent piece of writing will not necessarily translate well into film.

His sales experience translated well into his new job as a fund-raiser.

verb
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(physics) To subject (a body) to translation, i.e., to move a body on a linear path with no rotation.
verb
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(archaic) To move or carry from one place or position to another; to transfer.
verb
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(Christianity) To remove to heaven without a natural death.

By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not see death; and was not found, because God had translated him. Heb. xi. 5.

verb
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(Christianity) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.

Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, when the king would have translated him from that poor bishopric to a better,...refused. Camden.

verb
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(music) To rearrange a song from one music genre to another.
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(medicine) To cause to move from one part of the body to another.

To translate a disease.

verb
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(analysis) (in Euclidean spaces) A set of points obtained by adding a given fixed vector to each point of a given set.
noun
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To translate is to convert from one language to another.

When you take text written in Spanish and rewrite it in English, this is an example of a situation where you translate the text.

verb
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To transfer from one place or condition to another.
verb
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To subject (a body) to translation.
verb
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To subject (messenger RNA) to translation.
verb
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To be changed or transformed in effect. Often used with into or to .
verb
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To move from one place or condition to another; transfer.
  • To convey directly to heaven without death.
  • To transfer (a bishop) from one see to another; also, to move (a saint's body or remains) from one place of interment to another.
verb
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To put into the words of a different language.
verb
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To change into another medium or form.

To translate ideas into action.

verb
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To put into different words; rephrase or paraphrase in explanation.
verb
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To transmit (a telegraphic message) again by means of an automatic relay.
verb
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To enrapture; entrance.
verb
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To convert into a chain of amino acids forming a specific protein: said of genetic information in the form of messenger RNA.
verb
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To impart translation to.
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To make a translation into another language.
verb
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To be capable of being translated.
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Origin of translate

  • Middle English translaten from Old French translater from Latin trānslātus past participle of trānsferre to transfer trāns- trans- lātus brought telə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English translaten from Classical Latin translatus, past participle of transferre, from trans- “across" + latus, "borne", "carried", irregular perfect passive participle of verb ferre “to bear". Displaced native Middle English awenden (“to change, translate") (from Old English āwendan), Middle English irecchen (“to explain, expound, interpret") (from Old English Ä¡ereccan), and Old English Ä¡eþēodan (“to engage in, translate").

    From Wiktionary