Sweat meaning

swĕt
(informal) To work long and hard.

Sweated over his term paper.

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To have (moisture) condense in small drops on a surface.
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To exude in droplets, as moisture from certain cheeses or sap from a tree.
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To make damp or wet with perspiration.

His shirt was sweated.

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Sweat is defined as to perspire by releasing moisture from the surface or pores of the skin.

An example of to sweat is a person's shirt being wet after they've run a five-mile race.

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To collect moisture in small drops from the air, as a cold water pipe.
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(informal) To fret or worry.

Don't sweat over the bills.

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To cause to perspire, as by drugs, heat, or strenuous exercise.

Running for the train got me sweated up.

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(metallurgy) To join (metal parts) by interposing cold solder and then heating.
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To steam (vegetables or other food).
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(informal) To fret or worry about.

Don't sweat the details.

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The colorless saline moisture excreted by the sweat glands; perspiration.
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Condensation of moisture in the form of droplets on a surface.
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Strenuous labor or exertion.

It took a lot of sweat to move the piano.

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A run given to a horse as exercise before a race.
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(informal) An anxious, fretful condition.

Got myself in a sweat over the deadline.

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(informal) A sweatsuit.
noun
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To give forth a characteristic salty moisture through the pores of the skin; perspire.
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To ferment.
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To come forth in drops through pores or a porous surface; ooze.
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To work hard enough to cause sweating.
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(informal) To suffer distress, anxiety, etc.
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To cause to sweat, or perspire, as by drugs, exercise, heat, etc.
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To cause to give forth moisture; esp., to ferment.

To sweat tobacco leaves.

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To make wet with sweat, or perspiration.
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To heat (a metal) in order to extract an easily fusible constituent.
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To unite (metal parts) by pressing them together, usually with solder between them, and heating the point of contact until fusion is effected.
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To remove particles of metal from (a coin) illegally, as by abrading.
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(slang) To try hard or too hard to get or achieve.
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(slang) To worry or be annoyed about.
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The clear, alkaline, salty liquid given forth in drops through the pores of the skin; perspiration.
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Moisture given forth or collected in droplets on the surface of something.
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A condition of eagerness, anxiety, impatience, etc.
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Hard work; drudgery.
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Exercise, as a run, given a horse before a race.
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Clothes worn for exercising, warming up, etc.; specif., a sweat suit.
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To excrete perspiration through the pores in the skin; perspire.
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To excrete wastes in perspiration.

Sweated out the toxins in the steam room.

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The colorless saline moisture excreted by the sweat glands; perspiration.
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The salty liquid given off by sweat glands in the skin of mammals. As sweat evaporates, the skin cools, causing a reduction in body heat.
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Fluid that exits the body through pores in the skin usually due to physical stress and/or high temperature for the purpose of regulating body temperature and removing certain compounds from the circulation.
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(UK, slang, military slang, especially WWI) A soldier (especially one who is old or experienced).
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(historical) The sweating sickness.
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(intransitive) To emit sweat.
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To cause to excrete moisture from the skin; to cause to perspire.

His physicians attempted to sweat him by most powerful sudorifics.

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(intransitive, informal) To work hard.

I've been sweating over my essay all day.

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(informal) To extract money, labour, etc. from, by exaction or oppression.

To sweat a spendthrift; to sweat labourers.

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(intransitive, informal) To worry.
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(colloquial) To worry about (something). [from 20th c.]
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To emit, in the manner of sweat.

To sweat blood.

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(intransitive) To emit moisture.

The cheese will start sweating if you don't refrigerate it.

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(intransitive, plumbing) To solder (a pipe joint) together.
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(slang) To stress out.

Stop sweatin' me!

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(intransitive) To cook slowly in shallow oil without browning.
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To excrete perspiration through the pores in the skin; perspire.
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(slang) no sweat
  • Easily done or handled.
  • Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
idiom
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(informal) sweat blood
  • To work diligently or strenuously.
  • To worry intensely.
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(slang) sweat bullets
  • To sweat profusely.
  • To worry intensely.
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sweat of (one's) brow
  • Hard work:
    Landscaped the yard by the sweat of my brow.
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no sweat
  • no trouble or difficulty at all; easily done
idiom
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(slang) sweat blood
  • to work very hard; overwork
  • to be impatient, apprehensive, anxious, etc.
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sweat it
  • to be worried or annoyed about something
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sweat off
  • to get rid of (weight) by sweating
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(informal) sweat out
  • to get rid of or try to get rid of by sweating
    To sweat out a cold.
  • to wait or suffer through (some ordeal, nuisance, etc.)
  • to anticipate or wait anxiously or impatiently for
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Origin of sweat

  • Middle English sweten from Old English swǣtan sweid- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English swāt, from Proto-Germanic *swait-, from Proto-Indo-European *swoyd- (“to sweat"), *sweyd-. Cognate with West Frisian swit, Dutch zweet, German Schweiß, Danish sved, Swedish svett, Yiddish שוויצן (shvitsn) (English shvitz), French sueur, Persian خوی (xway), Sanskrit स्वेद (svéda), Latvian sviedri, Tocharian B syā-, and Albanian djersë.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English swætan, from the noun swāt. Compare Dutch zweten, German schwitzen, Danish svede.

    From Wiktionary