Squeak meaning

skwēk
The definition of a squeak is a high-pitched sound or cry.

An example of a squeak is the noise a mouse makes.

noun
1
0
To give forth a short, shrill cry or sound.
verb
0
0
To utter in a thin, shrill voice.
verb
0
0
A short shrill cry or sound, such as that made by a mouse or a rusty hinge.
noun
0
0
An escape.

A close squeak.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To make or utter a short, sharp, high-pitched sound or cry.
verb
0
0
(chiefly brit., informal) To act as an informer; squeal.
verb
0
0
To utter or produce in a squeak.
verb
0
0
To cause (a door, etc.) to squeak.
verb
0
0
A thin, sharp, usually short sound or cry.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
An open source, full-featured implementation of the Smalltalk programming language that is widely used in multimedia applications and educational teaching projects. Squeak is object-oriented and reflective, and it includes class libraries and virtual machine plug-ins for numerous multimedia programs. The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative utilizes Squeak in its Etoys application for learning science and math. For more information, visit www.squeak.org. See Smalltalk and OLPC.
0
0
A short, high-pitched sound, as of two objects rubbing together, or the calls of small animals.
noun
0
0
(games) A card game similar to group solitaire.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To emit a short, high-pitched sound.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, slang) To inform, to squeal.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To speak or sound in a high-pitched manner.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, games) To empty the pile of 13 cards a player deals to themself in the card game of the same name.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, informal) To win or progress by a narrow margin.
verb
0
0
Squeak is defined as to make a high-pitched sound or cry.

An example of squeak is opening a door with hinges that need to be oiled.

verb
0
1
(slang) To turn informer.
verb
0
1
Advertisement
narrow squeak
  • a narrow escape
idiom
0
0
squeak through
  • to succeed, get through, survive, etc. by a narrow margin or with difficulty
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

squeak through

Origin of squeak

  • Middle English squeken perhaps of Scandinavian origin Old Norse skvakka to croak

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition