Ski meaning

skē
Something that is used as a runner on a vehicle.

A helicopter with skis for landing on snow and ice.

noun
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To travel or glide on skis, especially as a sport.
verb
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To travel or glide over on skis.

Ski a mountain slope.

verb
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A long, thin runner of wood, metal, or now usually fiberglass, that is fastened to a kind of boot (ski boot) and used in pairs to glide over snow.
noun
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To travel on skis by gliding over the snow.
verb
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To engage in the sport of gliding down snow-covered inclines on skis.
verb
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verb
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To travel over on skis.
verb
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One of a pair of long flat runners designed for gliding over snow.
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(intransitive) To move on skis.
verb
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To travel over (a slope etc.) on skis; travel on skis at (a place), especially as a sport.
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(informal, humorous) Added to a word, name, or phrase to invoke Russianness.
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Origin of ski

  • Norwegian from Old Norse skīdh stick, snowshoe skei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Norwegian ski, related to Old Norse skíð (“stick of wood, snowshoe"), from Proto-Germanic *skÄ«dÄ… (“stick"), from Proto-Indo-European root *skei- (“to cut, split") (see also shed). Cognate with Old English scid (“stick of wood") (obsolete English shide), Old High German skit (Modern German Scheit (“log")).

    From Wiktionary

  • USA, from Russian -ский (-skij, “adjectival suffix”), perhaps influenced by Russki or other -ski ending terms such as Russian surnames.

    From Wiktionary