Sir meaning

sûr
(archaic) A term of address used with the title of a man's office, rank, or profession.

Sir priest, sir judge, sir knight.

noun
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The definition of a sir is a man of high ranking, or a title of respect, or a reference to a man.

An example of a sir is Sir Edmund Hillary.

An example of sir is how a sales person would ask a male customer if he found everything he needed.

An example of sir is a respectful way to start a letter to a man; Dear Sir.

noun
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An address to a military superior of either sex.

Yes sir.

noun
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Used as an honorific before the given name or the full name of baronets and knights.
noun
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The title used before the given name or full name of a knight or baronet.

Sir Walter Ralegh.

noun
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(bible) Sirach.
abbreviation
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(Serial InfraRed) The physical protocol of the IrDA wireless transmission standard. See IrDA.
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A man of a higher rank or position.
noun
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An address to any male, especially if his name or proper address is unknown.

Excuse me, sir, could you tell me where the nearest bookstore is?

noun
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To address (someone) using "sir".

"Right this way, sir." "” "You don't have to sir me."

He sirred me! Do I really look that masculine just because I'm wearing a tie?

verb
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(UK) The titular prefix given to a knight or baronet.
noun
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The principal group of benevolent deities in the Norse pantheon, representing power and war; opponents of the Vanir.
pronoun
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Used as a form of polite address for a man.

Don't forget your hat, sir.

noun
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Used as a salutation in a letter.

Dear Sir or Madam.

noun
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Sirach.
abbreviation
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A man of rank; lord.
noun
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A respectful term of address used to a man: not followed by the given name or surname and often used in the salutation of a letter.

Dear Sir.

noun
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Origin of sir

  • Middle English variant of sire sire sire

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sir, from Old French sire (“master, sir, lord"), from Latin senior (“older, elder"), from senex (“old"). Compare sire, signor, seignior, señor.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse æsir.

    From Wiktionary