Simplicity meaning

sĭm-plĭs'ĭ-tē
The quality or state of being simple, unmixed, or uncompounded; as, the simplicity of metals or of earths.
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The property, condition, or quality of being simple or uncombined.
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Absence of luxury or showiness; plainness.
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A simple state or quality, as of form or composition; freedom from intricacy or complexity.
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Absence of elegance, embellishment, luxury, etc.; plainness.
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Freedom from affectation, subtlety, etc.; artlessness.
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The quality or state of being not complex, or of consisting of few parts; as, the simplicity of a machine.
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Artlessness of mind; freedom from cunning or duplicity; lack of acuteness and sagacity.
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Freedom from artificial ornament, pretentious style, or luxury; plainness; as, simplicity of dress, of style, or of language; simplicity of diet; simplicity of life.
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Freedom from subtlety or abstruseness; clearness; as, the simplicity of a doctrine; the simplicity of an explanation or a demonstration.
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Freedom from complication; efficiency.
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Weakness of intellect; silliness; folly.
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(rare) An act or instance of foolishness.
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Simplicity is freedom from extravagance, luxury and complexity.

An example of simplicity is sitting in a lush meadow on a summer's day.

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Absence of affectation or pretense.
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Lack of sense; foolishness.
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Origin of simplicity

  • Middle English simplicite from Old French from Latin simplicitās from simplex simplic- simple sem-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French simplicite, from Latin simplicitas, from simplex (“simple"); see simple.
    From Wiktionary