Silk definitions

sĭlk
A fine lustrous fiber composed mainly of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons, especially the strong, elastic, fibrous secretion of silkworms used to make thread and fabric.
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Silk is a soft thread-like fiber spun by silkworms.

An example of silk is the fabric of a traditional kimono.

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The definition of silk is something smooth like or made of the very soft and fine threads spun by silkworms.

An example of silk is smooth and creamy chocolate truffles; silk truffles.

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Thread or fabric made from this fiber.
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A garment made from this fabric.
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A silky filamentous material spun by a spider or an insect such as a webspinner.
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A silky filamentous material produced by a plant, such as the styles forming a tuft on an ear of corn.
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Composed of or similar to the fiber or the fabric silk.
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To develop silk. Used of corn.
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The fine, soft, shiny fiber produced by silkworms to form their cocoons.
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Thread or fabric made from this fiber.
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Any silklike filament or substance, as that produced by spiders, or that within a milkweed pod, on the end of an ear of corn, etc.
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A garment or other article made of this fabric.
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A distinctive silk uniform, as of a jockey.
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The silk gown worn by a King's (or Queen's) Counsel in British law courts.
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Of or like silk; silken.
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To develop silk.
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A fiber produced by silkworms to form cocoons. Silk is strong, flexible, and fibrous, and is essentially a long continuous strand of protein. It is widely used to make thread and fabric.
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A substance similar to the silk of the silkworm but produced by other insect larvae or by spiders to spin webs.
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A polymer-based, dielectric resin from Dow Chemical (www.dow.com) that is used to insulate the aluminum or copper wire traces on a chip. See ILD.
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(uncountable) A fine fiber excreted by the silkworm or other arthropod (such as a spider).

The silk thread was barely visible.

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(uncountable) A fine, soft cloth woven from silk fibers.

I had a small square of silk, but it wasn't enough to make what I wanted.

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The gown worn by a Senior (i.e. Queen's/King's) Counsel.
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(colloquial) A Senior (i.e. Queen's/King's) Counsel.
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Made of silk.
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Looking like silk, silken.
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The brightly colored identifying garments of a jockey or harness driver.
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Origin of silk

Old English sioloc, seolc. The immediate source is uncertain; it probably reached English via the Baltic trade routes (cognates in Old Norse silki, Russian шёлк (Å¡olk), obsolete Lithuanian zilkaÄ©), all ultimately from Late Latin sÄ“ricus, from Latin sericus, from Ancient Greek σηρικός (serikos), ultimately from an Oriental language (represented now by e.g. Chinese çµ² (sÄ«, “silk")). Compare Seres.