Sheaf meaning

shēf
A quantity of the stalks and ears of wheat, rye, or other grain, bound together; a bundle of grain or straw.
noun
1
0
A collection of things gathered together; bundle, as of papers.
noun
0
0
verb
0
0
Any collection of things bound together; a bundle.

A sheaf of paper.

noun
0
0
A bundle of arrows sufficient to fill a quiver, or the allowance of each archer.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A quantity of arrows, usually twenty-four.
noun
0
0
(mechanical) A sheave.
noun
0
0
(mathematics) An abstract construct in topology that associates data to the open sets of a topological space, together with well-defined restrictions from larger to smaller open sets, subject to the condition that compatible data on overlapping open sets corresponds, via the restrictions, to a unique datum on the union of the open sets.
noun
0
0
To gather and bind into a sheaf; to make into sheaves; as, to sheaf wheat.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To collect and bind cut grain, or the like; to make sheaves.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A bundle of cut stalks of grain or similar plants bound with straw or twine.
noun
0
2
A collection of items held or bound together.

A sheaf of printouts.

noun
0
2
An archer's quiver.
noun
0
2
To gather and bind into a bundle.
verb
0
2
A bunch of cut stalks of grain, etc. bound up in a bundle.
noun
0
2
Advertisement

Origin of sheaf

From Old English sceaf, from Proto-Germanic. Akin to German Schaub, Old Norse skauf (“a fox's tail"). Compare Gothic 𐍃𐌺𐌿𐍆𐍄 (skuft, “hair of the head"), German Schopf (“tuft"), Albanian çup (“without tail, maimed").