Receipt meaning

rĭ-sēt
Frequency:
To give a receipt.
verb
5
2
Receipt is defined as to accept something given to you or is a record of money being received.

An example of receipt is when someone hands you a box of chocolates and you take it.

An example of receipt is a paper you get at the supermarket listing your groceries and what you paid for them.

noun
4
0
To mark (a bill) as having been paid.
verb
4
0
A recipe.
noun
4
2
To give or write a receipt for (money paid or goods or services delivered).
verb
2
0
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A receiving or being received.
noun
2
0
To write a receipt for (goods, etc.)
verb
2
1
noun
1
0
A quantity or amount received.

Cash receipts.

noun
0
0
A written acknowledgment that something, as goods, money, etc., has been received.
noun
0
0
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The thing or amount received, as money taken in by a business.
noun
0
0
To mark (a bill) paid.
verb
0
0
To write a receipt.
verb
0
0
The act of receiving, or the fact of having been received.
noun
0
0
(in the plural) A quantity or amount received; takings.

This weekend's receipts alone cover our costs to mount the production!

noun
0
0
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A written acknowledgment that a specified article or sum of money has been received.
noun
0
0
To give or write a receipt (for something)

To receipt delivered goods.

verb
0
0
To put a receipt on, as by writing or stamping; to mark a bill as having been paid.

To receipt a bill.

verb
0
0
A written acknowledgment that a specified article, sum of money, or shipment of merchandise has been received.
noun
0
1
A recipe, instructions, prescription.
noun
0
1
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Origin of receipt

  • Middle English receite from Old North French from Medieval Latin recepta medical prescription, money received from Latin feminine past participle of recipere to receive receive

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded since c.1386 as "statement of ingredients in a potion or medicine," from Anglo-Norman or Old Northern French receite "receipt, recipe" (1304), altered (by influence of receit "he receives," from Vulgar Latin *recipit) from Old French recete, from Old French receptus, past participle of recipere, itself from re- 'back' + cipere (an alteration of capere 'to take')

    From Wiktionary