Quiver meaning

kwĭvər
To shake with a slight, rapid, tremulous movement.
verb
18
2
A portable case for holding arrows.
noun
12
3
To tremble, as from cold or strong emotion.
verb
7
3
A case for holding arrows.
noun
4
1
A case full of arrows.
noun
3
0
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The act or motion of quivering.
noun
2
1
A collection or store; arsenal.

A quiver of ready responses.

noun
1
0
To shake with a tremulous motion; tremble.
verb
1
1
The act or condition of quivering; tremor; tremble.
noun
1
2
Quiver is defined as to shake rapidly or tremble.

An example of quiver is a cold shiver.

verb
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The definition of a quiver is a case for arrows.

An example of a quiver is the bag which hung over Robin Hood's back to hold his arrows.

noun
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(weaponry) A container for arrows, crossbow bolts or darts, such as those fired from a bow, crossbow or blowgun.
noun
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(figuratively) A ready storage location for figurative tools or weapons.

He's got lots of sales pitches in his quiver.

noun
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Shaking or moving with a slight trembling motion.
noun
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(mathematics) A multidigraph.
noun
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(archaic) Nimble, active.
adjective
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(intransitive) To shake or move with slight and tremulous motion; to tremble; to quake; to shudder; to shiver.
verb
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The arrows in it.
noun
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1

Origin of quiver

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman quiveir variant of Old French cuivre from Old Low Franconian cocar probably from Medieval Latin cucurum probably from Hunnish Mongolian kökür

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English quiveren perhaps from quiver nimble (from Old English cwifer- gwei- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English quiver, from Anglo-Norman quiveir, from Old Dutch cocare (compare Dutch koker), from Hunnic *kukur (“flask, cask") (compare Uyghur (Taranči) kökür, Kazakh kökkör), from Mongolic *köky- (“to suckle") (compare Kalmyk кøкyp (kokür, “leather flask for kumis"), Middle Mongolian [script?] (køkygyr, “cowhide water- or wine-cask")). Replaced early modern English cocker. More at cocker.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English cwiver, from Old English *cwifer

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English quiveren, probably from the adjective.

    From Wiktionary