Pulley meaning

po͝olē
Frequency:
A small fixed wheel, sometimes turning in a block, with a grooved rim in which a rope or chain runs, as to raise a weight attached at one end by pulling on the other end: it changes the direction of effort but provides no mechanical advantage.
noun
25
13
A wheel that turns or is turned by a belt, rope, chain, etc., so as to transmit power.
noun
19
10
A wheel turned by or driving a belt.
noun
18
10
A simple machine consisting essentially of a wheel with a grooved rim in which a pulled rope or chain can run to change the direction of the pull and thereby lift a load.
noun
12
9
A machine consisting of a wheel over which a pulled rope or chain runs to change the direction of the pull used for lifting a load. Combinations of two or more pulleys working together reduce the force needed to lift a load.
5
1
Advertisement
A combination of such wheels, used to increase the mechanical advantage.
noun
5
5
The definition of a pulley is a small fixed wheel or a group of such wheels with a rope or chain in a grooved rim that is used to lift something up.

An example of a pulley is a device for raising a flag.

noun
0
0
One of the simple machines; a wheel with a grooved rim in which a pulled rope or chain will lift an object (more useful when two or more pulleys are used together such that a small force moving through a greater distance can exert a larger force through a smaller distance).
noun
0
0
To raise or lift by means of a pulley.

verb
0
0

Origin of pulley

  • Middle English poley from Old French polie and from Medieval Latin poliva both ultimately from Greek polos axis kwel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English polley, pullie, from Old French poulie, polie (“a pulley"), (compare Medieval Latin polea, polegia, polegium; Middle Dutch puleye), of Germanic origin, from or related to Middle Low German pulen (“to pull"), Old English pullian (“to pull") . More at pull.

    From Wiktionary