Parody definition

părə-dē
Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty.

The trial was a parody of justice.

noun
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(music) The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
noun
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A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
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A poor or weak imitation.
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The art of writing such works.
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The definition of a parody is an imitation of something, particularly literature or a film, that is meant to make fun of it.

An example of parody is the film Scary Movie.

noun
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A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
noun
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To make a parody of.
verb
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Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty.

The trial was a parody of justice.

noun
0
0
(music) The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
noun
0
0
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A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
noun
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A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
noun
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To make a parody of.
verb
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A literary or musical work imitating the characteristic style of some other work or of a writer or composer in a satirical or humorous way, usually by applying it to an inappropriate subject.
noun
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To make a parody of.
verb
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A work or performance that imitates another work or performance with ridicule or irony.
noun
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(archaic) A popular maxim, adage, or proverb.
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To make a parody of something.

The comedy movie parodied the entire Western genre.

verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
parody
Plural:
parodies

Origin of parody

  • Latin parōdia from Greek parōidiā para- subsidiary to para–1 aoidē, ōidē song wed-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin parōdia from Greek parōidiā para- subsidiary to para–1 aoidē, ōidē song wed-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin parodia, from Ancient Greek παρῳδία (parōdia, “parody"), from παρά (para, “besides") + ᾠδή (ōidÄ“, “song").

    From Wiktionary