Parchment meaning

pärch'mənt
Parchment is paper made from the skin of an animal, or a documents written on this type of paper.

When you want a fancy paper for your wedding invitations and you order thin, stiff, flat paper made from sheepskin, this is an example of parchment.

A collection of old maps and poems written on sheepskin is an example of parchment.

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The skin of a sheep or goat prepared as a material on which to write or paint.
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A written text or drawing on a sheet of this material.
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Paper made in imitation of this material.
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The skin of an animal, usually a sheep or goat, prepared as a surface on which to write or paint.
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Paper specially treated to resemble parchment, and used for lampshades, stationery, etc.
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A document, manuscript, or diploma on parchment.
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A material, made from the polished skin of a calf, sheep, goat or other animal, used like paper for writing.
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A document made on such material.
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A diploma (traditionally written on parchment).
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Stiff paper imitating that material.
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The creamy to tanned color of parchment.
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The envelope of the coffee grains, inside the pulp.
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Origin of parchment

  • Middle English parchemin, parchement (influenced by Medieval Latin pergamentum) from Old French parchemin from Late Latin pergamīna variant of Latin pergamēna from feminine of Pergamēnus of Pergamum from Greek Pergamēnos after Pergamon (Pergamum)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English parchement, from Old French parchemin, via Latin pergamÄ«na, from Ancient Greek Περγαμηνός (PergamÄ“nos, “of Pergamun"), which is named for the Ancient city of Pergamon (modern Bergama) in Asia Minor, where it was invented as an expensive alternative for papyrus.
    From Wiktionary