Paragon definition

părə-gŏn, -gən
Frequency:
A model or pattern of perfection or excellence.
noun
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A model of excellence or perfection of a kind; a peerless example.

A paragon of virtue.

noun
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A perfect diamond weighing a hundred carats or more.
noun
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The definition of a paragon is a model of excellence or perfection, or a flawless diamond that weighs at least one hundred carats.

An example of paragon is a perfect research paper.

noun
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Paragon is defined as to compare or be a match for.

An example of paragon is to compare each page of the student's work against a page of the teacher's work.

verb
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(printing) A type size of 20 points.
noun
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An unflawed diamond weighing at least 100 carats.
noun
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A very large spherical pearl.
noun
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To equal; match.
verb
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A large, perfectly round pearl.
noun
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(obs.) To surpass.
verb
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To put side by side; compare.
verb
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To be equal to; match.
verb
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A person of preeminent qualities, who acts as a pattern or model of some given (especially positive) quality. [from 16th c.]

In the novel, Constanza is a paragon of virtue who would never compromise her reputation.

noun
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(typography) A size of type between great primer and double pica. [from 18th c.]
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A flawless diamond of at least 100 carats.
noun
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To compare; to parallel; to put in rivalry or emulation with.

verb
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To compare with; to equal; to rival.

verb
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To serve as a model for; to surpass.
verb
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To be equal; to hold comparison.
verb
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To compare; parallel.
verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
paragon
Plural:
paragons

Origin of paragon

  • Obsolete French from Old French from Old Italian paragone from paragonare to test on a touchstone perhaps from Greek parakonān to sharpen para- alongside para–1 akonē whetstone ak- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman paragone, peragone, Middle French paragon, from Italian paragone (“comparison"), from paragonare, from Ancient Greek παρακονάω (parakonaō, “I sharpen, whet"), from παρά (para) + ἀκόνη (akonÄ“, “whetstone").

    From Wiktionary