Orchestra meaning

ôr'kĭ-strə, -kĕs'trə
Orchestra is the place in front of the stage where musicians sit at a play, or a large group of musicians.

An example of the orchestra is the lowered section in front of the stage where musicians play during a Broadway musical.

An example of an orchestra is a group of musicians playing string, wind brass and percussion instruments.

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The area in a theater or concert hall where the musicians sit, immediately in front of and below the stage.
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A semicircular space in front of the stage used by the chorus in ancient Greek theaters.
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In ancient Greek theaters, the semicircular space in front of the stage, used by the chorus.
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In modern theaters, the space in front of and lower than the stage, where the musicians sit.
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(music) A large group of musicians who play together on various instruments, usually including some from strings, woodwind, brass and/or percussion; the instruments played by such a group.
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A semicircular space in front of the stage used by the chorus in Ancient Greek and Hellenistic theatres.
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The area in a theatre or concert hall where the musicians sit, immediately in front of and below the stage, sometimes (also) used by other performers.
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Origin of orchestra

  • Latin orchēstra the space in front of the stage in Greek theaters where the chorus performed from Greek orkhēstrā from orkheisthai to dance
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin < Ancient Greek ὀρχήστρα (orchÄ“stra) < ὀρχοῦμαι (orchoumai, “to dance") (an intensification of ἔρχομαι (erkhomai, “to go, come"), from Proto-Indo-European *ergh- (“to set in motion, stir up, raise")) + suffix *-tra denoting "place".
    From Wiktionary