O-s meaning

(latin) Oculus sinister (left eye)
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Old series.
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Out of stock.
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Left eye.
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(latin) Oculus sinister (left eye)
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The fifteenth letter of the English alphabet, called o and written in the Latin script.
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A blood type that lacks A or B antigens and may only receive transfusions of similar type O blood, but may donate to all (neglecting Rh fact). Synonym: universal donor.
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The ordinal number fifteenth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called o and written in the Latin script.
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(cricket) The number of overs bowled.
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(printing) American Library Association Abbreviation of octavo, a book size (20-25 cm).
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(soccer) Someone associated with Leyton Orient Football Club, as a player, coach, supporter etc.
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Plural form of o.
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Origin of o-s

  • English O, o is attested in William Tyndale's 1525 New Testament Translation, as a translation of Ancient Greek ὦ, Latin o. (Compare the Old English particles èalà, æàlà, ǽlà, hèlà.) In Middle English, O is found in Acts 13:10, Romans 9:20 and Galatians 3:1, and ò is found in Romans 2:1,3, of John Wycliff's Newe Testament (1382). Compare la (a particle for introducing a statement or expressing surprise), from Old English; compare also English lo, oh.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare the Old Saxon gloss o (950s) of the Lambeth MS (957) of the Gallican Psalter and the ó, o (post-1000) of the Durham Hymns, regularly seen in the redundant forms "o eala þu" and "ó eala þu" by proper names.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare also the Anglo-Norman O (about 1200) of the manuscripts of Saints Juliana and Katherine, and other religious writs.

    From Wiktionary