Mouse meaning

mous
To hunt mice.
verb
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(informal) A discolored swelling under the eye caused by a blow; a black eye.
noun
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A cowardly or timid person.
noun
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(computers) A handheld, button-activated input device that when rolled along a flat surface directs an indicator to move correspondingly about a computer screen, allowing the operator to move the indicator freely, as to select operations or manipulate text or graphics.
noun
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To seek about or search for something busily and stealthily.
verb
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A cowardly or timid person.
noun
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To hunt mice.
verb
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To search furtively for something; prowl.
verb
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The definition of a mouse is a rodent in the Muridae or Cricetidae family, a shy person or a small hand-held device used to control the cursor on the computer display.

An example of a mouse is the character Stuart Little.

An example of a mouse is a person who is afraid of anything.

An example of a mouse is a Logitech wireless mouse.

noun
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(informal) A discolored swelling under the eye caused by a blow; a black eye.
noun
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To search furtively for something; prowl.
verb
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(computers) A handheld, button-activated input device that when rolled along a flat surface directs an indicator to move correspondingly about a computer screen, allowing the operator to move the indicator freely, as to select operations or manipulate text or graphics.
noun
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Any of a large number of small, widespread rodents belonging to various families and having small ears and a long, thin tail, esp., a species (Mus musculus) that commonly infests buildings.
noun
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(slang) A dark, swollen bruise under the eye; black eye.
noun
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To hunt for or catch mice.
verb
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The primary pointing device on a desktop computer. Laptops have the equivalent function in a built-in trackpad, although many users prefer the handheld mouse.Decades ago, it was called a "mouse" because the cord resembled a mouse's tail, and wired mice plug into the USB or PS/2 port. Today, most mice are cordless, using Bluetooth (if in the computer) or by plugging the transceiver that comes with the mouse into the USB port. See USB and PS/2 port.Although CAD and drawing programs, as well as every graphical interface, are designed to be used with a pointing device, many key commands in the OS and business applications are also available.Relative vs. AbsoluteMouse movement is relative. For example, a mouse could be moved along your arm or across your stomach, and the screen cursor would move from its existing location the same angle and distance. In contrast, the mouse-like object on a graphics tablet, which is correctly called a "tablet cursor" or "puck," is often not relative. It contacts the tablet with absolute reference, which means if you place the stylus on the upper left part of the tablet, the screen cursor appears on the upper left side of the screen. See pointing device, scroll mouse, mechanical mouse, optical mouse, Magic Mouse and mickey.Mice Are Not Always FriendlyIt is well known that hours of clicking can strain the wrist (see carpal tunnel syndrome). In addition, there is way too much mouse movement in today's operating systems and applications on desktop computers. Instead of the next item to click presented on screen close to the last position of the pointer (cursor), the next obvious selection is often at the other end of the screen. See good user interface.
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(comput.) A small, hand-held device that is moved about on a flat surface in front of a video screen in such a way as to move or position the cursor or part of the display.
noun
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A hand-held input device that is moved about on a flat surface to direct the cursor on a computer screen. It also has buttons for activating computer functions. The underside of a mechanical mouse contains a rubber-coated ball that rotates as the mouse is moved; optical sensors detect the motion and move the screen pointer correspondingly. An optical mouse is cordless and uses reflections from an LED to track the mouse's movement over a special reflective mat which is marked with a grid that acts as a frame of reference.
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A palm-sized computer navigation device that enables a user to move it about on a flat surface in order to move a cursor on the monitor.The user can position the cursor over an area of text or a navigation button and click on objects through the use of one or more control buttons on the mouse in order select items or invoke commands.
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Any small rodent of the genus Mus.
noun
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(informal) A member of the many small rodent and marsupial species resembling such a rodent.
noun
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A quiet or shy person.
noun
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(computing) (plural mice or, rarely, mouses) An input device that is moved over a pad or other flat surface to produce a corresponding movement of a pointer on a graphical display.
noun
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(boxing) Hematoma.
noun
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(nautical) A turn or lashing of spun yarn or small stuff, or a metallic clasp or fastening, uniting the point and shank of a hook to prevent its unhooking or straighening out.
noun
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A match used in firing guns or blasting.
noun
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(intransitive) To move cautiously or furtively, in the manner of a mouse (the rodent) (frequently used in the phrasal verb to mouse around).
verb
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(intransitive) To hunt or catch mice (the rodents), usually of cats.
verb
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(nautical) To close the mouth of a hook by a careful binding of marline or wire.

Captain Higgins moused the hook with a bit of marline to prevent the block beckets from falling out under slack.

verb
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(intransitive, computing) To navigate by means of a computer mouse.
verb
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Mouse is defined as to hunt for something, especially mice.

An example of to mouse is for a cat to hunt for dinner.

verb
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To hunt for.
verb
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(obs.) To tear or rend as a cat does a mouse.
verb
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Any of numerous small rodents of the families Muridae and Cricetidae, such as the house mouse, characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, and a long naked or almost hairless tail.
noun
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Any of various similar or related animals, such as the jumping mouse, the vole, or the jerboa.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mouse
Plural:
mice

Origin of mouse

  • Middle English mous from Old English mūs mūs- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English mous from Old English mūs mūs- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Germanic cognates include Old Frisian mūs, Old Saxon mūs (Dutch muis), Old High German mūs (German Maus), Old Norse mús (Swedish mus, Danish mus, Norwegian mus, Icelandic mús, Faroese mús).

    From Wiktionary

  • Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek μῦς (mūs), Latin mūs, Armenian մուկ (muk), Old Church Slavonic мꙑшь (myšĭ) (Russian мышь (myšʹ)), Albanian , Persian موش (muš), Sanskrit मूष् (mūṣ)

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English mous, from Old English mūs, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

    From Wiktionary