Mortify meaning

môrtə-fī
To discipline (one's body, appetites etc.) by suppressing desires; to practise abstinence on. [from 15th c.]

Some people seek sainthood by mortifying the body.

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To cause to experience shame, humiliation, or wounded pride.
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To undergo mortification; become gangrenous.
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To cause to feel shame, humiliation, chagrin, etc.; injure the pride or self-respect of.
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(now rare) To cause (bodily tissue) to decay or become gangrenous.
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To practice mortification.
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To cause to experience shame, humiliation, or wounded pride.
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To destroy the vitality or vigor of.
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(now rare) To decay or become gangrenous.
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To undergo mortification; become gangrenous.
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Hakewill.

He mortified pearls in vinegar.

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(usually used passively) To embarrass, to humiliate. [from 17th c.]

I was so mortified I could have died right there, instead I fainted, but I swore I'd never let that happen to me again.

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Addison.

How often is the ambitious man mortified with the very praises he receives, if they do not rise so high as he thinks they ought!

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(Scotland, law, historical) To grant in mortmain.
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To mortify is to shame or humiliate, or to practice self-denial.

When you make a fool of someone in public and embarrass him, this is an example of a time when you mortify him.

When you deny yourself a special pleasure as part of a religious fast, this is an example of a way to mortify yourself.

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To discipline (one's of the body and the appetites) by self-denial or self-inflicted privation, especially for religious reasons.
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To practice mortification of the body and its appetites.
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To punish (one's body) or control (one's physical desires and passions) by self-denial, fasting, etc., as a means of religious or ascetic discipline.
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Origin of mortify

  • Middle English mortifien to deaden, subdue from Old French mortifier from Latin mortificāre to kill mors mort- death mer- in Indo-European roots -ficāre -fy

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman mortifier, Middle French mortifier, from Late Latin mortificō (“cause death"), from Latin mors (“death") + -ficō (“-fy").

    From Wiktionary