Moan definition

mōn
A long, low vocal sound as of sorrow or pain or of sexual pleasure.
noun
95
23
To complain, lament, or grieve.

An old man who still moans about his misspent youth.

verb
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12
To utter a moan or moans.
verb
24
15
To say with a moan.
verb
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11
A complaint.

His tiresome moans about his boss.

noun
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3
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To make a sound resembling a moan.

A saxophone moaned in the background.

verb
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4
Moan is defined as to complain or grieve about something or to utter a low, long sound of pain.

An example of moan is to express extreme sorrow about a death in the family.

An example of moan is for a person to make a pained sound when having a stomach ache.

verb
4
1
The definition of a moan is a long, low sound, often due to pain.

An example of a moan is the sound that someone with a stomach ache may make.

noun
4
1
(archaic) A complaint; lamentation.
noun
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7
Any nonvocal sound like this.

The moan of the wind.

noun
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A similar sound.

The eerie moan of the night wind.

noun
2
1
To bewail or bemoan.

She moaned her misfortunes to anyone who would listen.

verb
2
1
To utter with moans or a moan.
verb
2
1
A low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure.
noun
2
1
A low, sustained, mournful cry, usually indicative of sorrow or pain.
noun
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3
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(now rare) To complain about; to bemoan, to bewail; to mourn. [from 13th c.]
verb
2
2
To utter a moan or moans.
verb
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(intransitive, now chiefly poetic) To grieve. [from 14th c.]
verb
1
2
(intransitive) To make a moan or similar sound. [from 18th c.]
verb
1
2
To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice. [from 19th c.]

‘Please don't leave me,’ he moaned.

verb
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2
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(intransitive, colloquial, chiefly UK) To complain; to grumble. [from 20th c.]
verb
1
2
To complain, lament, grieve, etc.
verb
1
4
To complain about; bewail.

To moan one's fate.

verb
1
4

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
moan
Plural:
moans

Origin of moan

  • Middle English mone from Old English mān mei-no- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English mone, mane, man, from Old English *mān (“complaint, lamentation”), from Proto-Germanic *mainō. Inferred from Old English mǣnan (“to complain over, grieve, mourn”). More at mean.

    From Wiktionary