Meteor meaning

mētē-ər, -ôr
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The definition of a meteor is a small body of matter from outer space that comes into the atmosphere of the Earth and that looks like a streak of light due to iridescence caused by friction.

A shooting star caused by a small object from outer space entering the earth's atmosphere is an example of a meteor.

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A rocky body that produces such light. Most meteors burn up before reaching the Earth's surface.
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A meteoroid or meteorite.
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A bright streak of light that appears in the sky when a meteoroid is heated to incandescence by friction with the earth's atmosphere.
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(meteorol.) Any atmospheric phenomenon, as precipitation, lightning, or a rainbow.
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The luminous phenomenon observed when a meteoroid is heated by its entry into the earth's atmosphere; shooting star; falling star.
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(loosely) A meteoroid or meteorite.
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Meteorological.
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Meteorology.
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A bright trail or streak of light that appears in the night sky when a meteoroid enters the Earth's atmosphere. The friction with the air causes the rock to glow with heat.
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(archaic) Any atmospheric phenomenon. (Thus the derivation of meteorology.) These were sometimes classified as aerial or airy meteors (winds), aqueous or watery meteors (hydrometeors: clouds, rain, snow, hail, dew, frost), luminous meteors (rainbows and aurora), and igneous or fiery meteors (lightning and shooting stars [next]).
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A fast-moving streak of light in the night sky caused by the entry of extraterrestrial matter into the earth's atmosphere: A shooting star or falling star.
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(juggling) A prop similar to poi balls, in that it is twirled at the end of a cord or cable.
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(martial arts) A striking weapon resembling a track and field hammer consisting of a weight swung at the end of a cable or chain.
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Origin of meteor

  • Middle English metheour atmospheric phenomenon from Old French meteore from Medieval Latin meteōrum from Greek meteōron astronomical phenomenon from neuter of meteōros high in the air meta- meta- -āoros lifted akin to āeirein to lift up wer-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Latin meteorum, from Ancient Greek μετέωρον (meteōron), from μετέωρος (meteōros, “raised from the ground, hanging, lofty"), from μετά (meta, “in the midst of, among, between") (English meta) + ἀείρω (aeiro, “to lift, to heave, to raise up").

    From Wiktionary

  • Original sense of “atmospheric phenomenon" gave rise to meteorology, now restricted to extraterrestrial objects burning up as they enter the atmosphere.

    From Wiktionary