Ladder meaning

lădər
Frequency:
Anything by means of which a person climbs or rises.
noun
4
2
A fish ladder.
noun
2
3
To run, as a stocking does.
verb
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3
(chiefly brit.) To have or cause to have a ladder, or run.
verb
1
1
(chiefly brit.) A run as in a stocking.
noun
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2
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The definition of a ladder is something made of two parallel side pieces with evenly spaced cross bars used for climbing, or a rising increase in levels.

An example of a ladder is what someone would use to climb to the ground from a fire escape on the second floor.

An example of a ladder is a person starting in an entry level position and climbing their way up to an executive position.

noun
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A frame, usually portable, of wood, metal, or rope, used for ascent and descent, consisting of two side pieces to which are fastened rungs: cross strips or rounds acting as steps.
noun
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(figuratively) The hierarchy or ranking system within an organization, e.g. the corporate ladder.
noun
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(chiefly UK) A length of unravelled fabric in a knitted garment, especially in nylon stockings; a run.
noun
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In the game of go, a sequence of moves following a zigzag pattern and ultimately leading to the capture of the attacked stones.
noun
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(firefighting) To ascend a building or wall using a ladder.
verb
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(of a knitted garment) To develop a ladder as a result of a broken thread.
verb
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A rising series of steps, stages, or levels.

The ladder of success.

noun
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ladder
Plural:
ladders

Origin of ladder

  • Middle English from Old English hlǣder klei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English hlǣder, from Proto-Germanic *hlaidriz (compare West Frisian ljedder, Dutch leer, German Leiter), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱleytro (compare Old Irish clithar 'hedge', Umbrian [script?] (kletram) 'stretcher'), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (“to lean”). More at lean, related to lid.

    From Wiktionary