Labyrinth meaning

lăbə-rĭnth
Frequency:
The definition of a labyrinth is a confusing maze or a confusing situation where it is difficult to know which direction to take.

An example of a labyrinth is a corn field maze on Halloween.

An example of a labyinth is the IRS tax code.

noun
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A structure consisting of an intricate network of winding passages bordered as by walls or hedges; specif., such a structure designed for prayer and meditation: technically, a labyrinth (unlike a maze) contains no dead ends and consists of a single path leading to a center.
noun
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(anat.) The inner ear.
noun
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The system of interconnecting canals and spaces that make up the inner ear of many vertebrates. The labyrinth has both a bony component, made up of the cochlea, the semicircular canals, and the vestibule, and a membranous one.
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Part of the inner ear.
noun
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(figuratively) Anything complicated and confusing, like a maze.
noun
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To enclose in a labyrinth, or as though in a labyrinth.
verb
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To arrange in the form of a labyrinth.
verb
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Something highly intricate or convoluted in character, composition, or construction.

A labyrinth of rules and regulations.

noun
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A complicated, perplexing arrangement, course of affairs, etc.
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(gr. myth., place, proper) The labyrinthine structure built by Daedalus for King Minos of Crete, to house the Minotaur.
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A group of complex interconnecting anatomical cavities.
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A maze, especially underground or covered.
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Origin of labyrinth

  • Middle English laberinthe from Latin labyrinthus from Greek laburinthos possibly akin to labrus double-headed ax (used as a ritual weapon and a sign of authority in Minoan civilization, so that Greek laburinthos may originally have designated a Minoan palace as “the house of the double-headed ax”) of Lydian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin labyrinthus, from Ancient Greek λαβύρινθος (labúrinthos, “maze”), possibly from an Anatolian language (compare Lydian lábrus 'double-edged axe' and -inthos, a suffix typical of Anatolian placenames), although the actual etymology of labyrinth is still a matter of conjecture.

    From Wiktionary