Kettle meaning

kĕtl
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A metal pot, usually with a lid, for boiling or stewing.
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The definition of a kettle is a metal pot or other container used for boiling.

An example of a kettle is what you'd use to boil water for tea.

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(UK, of the police) To contain demonstrators in a confined area.
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A teakettle.
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(music) A kettledrum.
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(geology) A depression left in a mass of glacial drift, formed by the melting of an isolated block of glacial ice.
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A pothole.
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A metal container for boiling or cooking things; pot.
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A teakettle.
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A kettledrum.
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A steep, bowl-shaped hollow in ground once covered by a glacier. Kettles are believed to form when a block of ice left by a glacier becomes covered by sediments and later melts, leaving a hollow. They are usually tens of meters deep and up to tens of kilometers in diameter and often contain surface water.
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A vessel for boiling a liquid or cooking food, usually metal and equipped with a lid.

To cook pasta, you first need to put the kettle on.

There's a hot kettle of soup on the stove.

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The quantity held by a kettle.
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(UK) A vessel for boiling water for tea; a teakettle.

Stick the kettle on and we'll have a nice cup of tea.

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(geology) A kettle hole, sometimes any pothole.
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(ornithology) A collective term for a group of raptors riding a thermal, especially when migrating.
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(rail transport, slang) A steam locomotive.
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(music) A kettledrum.
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Origin of kettle

  • Middle English ketel from Old Norse ketill Old English cetel both from Latin catīllus diminutive of catīnus large bowl

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ketel, also chetel, from Old Norse ketill and Old English cytel, cetel, citel (“kettle, cauldron”), both from Proto-Germanic *katilaz (“kettle, bucket, vessel”), of uncertain origin and formation. Usually regarded as a borrowing of Late Latin catīllus (“small bowl”), diminutive of catinus (“deep bowl, vessel for cooking up or serving food”), however, the word may be Germanic confused with the Latin: compare Old High German chezzi (“a kettle, dish, bowl”), Old English cete (“cooking pot”), Icelandic kati, ketla (“a small boat”). Cognate with West Frisian tsjettel (“kettle”), Dutch ketel (“kettle”), German Kessel (“kettle”), Swedish kittel (“kettle”), Gothic (katils, “kettle”). Compare also Russian котёл (kotjól, “boiler, cauldron”).

    From Wiktionary