Intestine meaning

ĭn-tĕstĭn
Frequency:
(archaic) Internal, with regard to a country or community; domestic; civil.
adjective
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Internal; civil.

The intestine affairs of the nation.

adjective
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Internal; civil.

The intestine affairs of the nation.

adjective
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Hume.

An intestine struggle […] between authority and liberty.

adjective
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Milton.

Hoping here to end / Intestine war in heaven, the arch foe subdued.

adjective
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The portion of the digestive tract extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consisting of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.
noun
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The lower part of the alimentary canal, extending from the stomach to the anus and consisting of the small intestine and the large intestine; bowels.
noun
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The portion of the digestive tract extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consisting of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.
noun
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The muscular tube that forms the part of the digestive tract extending from the stomach to the anus and consisting of the small and large intestines. In the intestine, nutrients and water from digested food are absorbed and waste products are solidified into feces.
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(anatomy, often pluralized) The alimentary canal of an animal through which food passes after having passed all stomachs.
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One of certain subdivisions of this part of the alimentary canal, such as the small or large intestine in human beings.
noun
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Domestic; taking place within a given country or region.
adjective
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Origin of intestine

  • Middle English from Old French intestin from Latin intestīna intestines from neuter pl. of intestīnus internal from intus within en in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin intestīnum, neuter of intestīnus (“internal”), as Etymology 2, below.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin intestīnus (“internal”), from intus (“within”).

    From Wiktionary