Induct definition

ĭn-dŭkt
To formally or ceremoniously install in an office, position, et cetera.
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(physics) To induce.
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To admit as a member; receive.
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To admit to military service.

A draftee waiting to be inducted into the army.

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To introduce, as to new experience or knowledge; initiate.

She was inducted into the ways of the legal profession.

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To bring formally into a society or organization; initiate.
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To provide with knowledge or experience of something, esp. something not open to all.

Inducting them into the secrets of the trade.

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To enroll (esp. a draftee) in the armed forces.
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To introduce into (particularly if certain knowledge or experience is required, such as ritual adulthood or cults).
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To draft into military service.
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To bring in as a member.
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To place ceremoniously or formally in an office or position; install.

A service to induct the new president of the university.

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(obs.) To bring or lead in.
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To place in a benefice or official position with formality or ceremony; install.
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Origin of induct

  • Middle English inducten from Latin indūcere induct- induce

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Originated 1350–1400 from Middle English induct, from Latin inductus, perfect passive participle of indūcō, equivalent to induce + -tus (past participle suffix).

    From Wiktionary