Inductance meaning

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The property of an electric circuit by which an electromotive force is induced in it as the result of a changing magnetic flux.
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A circuit element, typically a conducting coil, in which electromotive force is generated by electromagnetic induction.
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The property of an electric circuit by which a varying current in it produces a varying magnetic field that induces voltages in the same circuit or in a nearby circuit: it is measured in henrys.
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The capacity of an electric circuit for producing a counter electromotive force when the current changes.
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A measure of the reaction of electrical components (especially coils) to changes in current flow by creating a magnetic field and inducing a voltage. Its unit is the henry.
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The magnetic field that is generated when a current is passed through an inductor, typically a wire coil. Inductance is measured in henrys (H). See inductor and induction.
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The property of an electric circuit or device by virtue of which a varying current induces an electromotive force (emf), i.e., voltage (V), in that circuit or device, or in an adjacent circuit or device. See also circuit, current, emf, and voltage.
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The property of an electric circuit by which a voltage is induced in it by a changing magnetic field.

The power cable itself has enough inductance to disrupt the digital signal of the video output cable, due to poor shielding.

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The quantity of the resulting electromagnetic flux divided by the current that produces it, measured in henries (SI symbol: H.)

What is the inductance of that power supply's main inductor?

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